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what determines the....

Discussion in 'Cell Tower Hunting Club' started by Rollindown95, Jul 7, 2006.

  1. Rollindown95

    Rollindown95 Junior Member
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    what determines the height of a particular tower or pole, is it zoning, cheapness? becasue it seems the ones by interstaes are tallest is that b/c the companies that lease it can afford the height and to give it more range?

    does height mean anything except for it gives more reception over terrain?
     
  2. wirles

    wirles I'm baaaaaaaaaack
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    The height requirements for modern PCS systems are not like that of the old analog systems. Back then, capacity wasn't really an issue so they simply put the antennas up high and blasted away. Think shotgun approach to coverage. Now height is very calculated for a specific propogation to cover a specific location. Downtilts, and azimuths are more critical now than ever and the networks are always being tested and optimized. Height is often limited by zoning. If a carrier wants 200', money will not be the reason they go at 150'. It will be due to either zoning limiting the tower height, or another physical issue precluding their ability to get the desired height. In California, you will find a lot of 60' monopoles along the highways.

    It also has to do with HAAT (height above avergae terrain). In more rural areas with hilly topologies, you will find heights that are higher AMSL (Above sea level) although the towers may be on top of the hill and therefore are not that tall AGL (above ground level). For example, along I-78 around Allentown, you may have a T-Mobile site that is on a 250' tower right laong the highway (in a hole) but a couple of miles down the road you will find a site that is 150' up on a 400' tower....but it sits on a hilltop, like WZZO's tower.

    I think I am talking in circles now :biggrin: Did that help or confuse it even more?
     

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