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Rx Pwr, Ec/Io, FER oh my?

Discussion in 'Sprint Forum' started by KenRay, Jan 17, 2006.

  1. KenRay

    KenRay New Member

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    I was poking around on my SprintPPC 6601 phone and found a little file called Field Trail Monitor. Lots of cool info, but if you don't know what the info is, it is not helpful?

    I figured Pwr is signal power, and did some reading and found that the Ec/Io is somthing like signal noise. I have not found out what the FER is.

    Also can any one tell me what are ideal numbers for each? And what are the worst numbers?


    :)
     
  2. Andy

    Andy Diamond Senior Member
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    Well,
    -106 for the Rx Power level is about no service. the closer to zero that number is, the closer you are to a cellsite.
    The closer the Ec/Io is to zero, the better. A cellsite with an Ec/Io of something less than -10 is supposed to be 'unhealthy' and calls may start to drop or deteriorate.
    Hope this helps.
     
  3. larry

    larry Sprint loyalist and former mod
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    I don't think -10 on the Ec/Io itself is that bad but the problem is the phone will start handing off to other sites/pn offsets after that level and this could cause drops or breakups. CDMA technology has some weird quirks.
     
  4. Andy

    Andy Diamond Senior Member
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    Absolutely, I have noticed exactly what you've described. But I've heard from 'experts' on CDMA that a cellsite that emits an Ec/Io of -10 or lower is said to be unhealthy and may need more capacity added.
     
  5. CellularWizard82

    CellularWizard82 New Member

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    FER is frame error rate or frame error erasure rate depends on what book you read. its a method of testing the reciever of a mobile station. ec/io is eneregy per chip over interferance basically and it varies depending on how the engineer has setup the site. to many calls and not enough pilot power will give you a a bad ec/io. thats why in cdma networks you have the ability to adjust your power allocated to your pilot and traffic, if you couldnt cell breathing would be a serious issue.
     
  6. parviz

    parviz New Member

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    Ec/Io - Pilot energy accumulated over one PN chip period (Ec) to the total power spectral density.
    Io means the total power of effective signal and noise in the signal band.

    The received signal strengths should be between -35dBm and -75dBm with Pilot Ec/Io greater than -10dB. (c) 3gpp
     
  7. parviz

    parviz New Member

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    -106 - maybe you mean RSSI?

    I make call with -110-115 RSSI (of course not perfect audibility) from car in speed 60 km/h
    I think -116 RSSI deadline
     
  8. larry

    larry Sprint loyalist and former mod
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    Many CDMA phones won't show anything after -106 RSSI. -106 is the limit on my phone and usually means no service.
     
  9. ace41690

    ace41690 Junior Member
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    My blackberry has shown -117dbm. Of course it is not useable. and i think its a fluke because it usually just goes to -110. Mine is useable at -105, tho anything after that is iffy.
     
  10. larry

    larry Sprint loyalist and former mod
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    Blackberry's are different with their readings. Most regular (non-smart phones) go to -105 or -106.
     
  11. parviz

    parviz New Member

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    There is no specified relationship of any particular physical parameter to the RSSI reading. The 802.11 standard does not define any relationship between RSSI value and any energy level as would be measured in mW or dBm. Individual vendors provide their own accuracy, granularity, and range for the actual power (measured as mW or dBm) and their range of RSSI values (from 0 to RSSI_Max). (c)
    :cool:
     
  12. TelcomJunkie

    TelcomJunkie Bad Handoff Investigator
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    Right and the 802.11 standard doesn't apply to cellular technologies.

    Typically in the cellular industry, common practice is to, especially in the phones themselves, interchange "received power level" and RSSI. What most users say is RSSI is really their Received Power level and the receivers in the phone do register what they receive in either dBm (typically) or mW instead of the arbitrarily used RSSI integers.
     
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