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Revisited: Nokia 8260 vs Motorola V60t

Discussion in 'NOKIA' started by ATLguy, Apr 28, 2002.

  1. ATLguy

    ATLguy Junior Member
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    I may be in the market for a new handset and was curious if anyone has had an opportunity to compare the Nokia 8260 side-by-side with the Motorola V60t. I currently have an 8260 with Cingular and have been experiencing some problems (detailed in another post if you're interested).

    Can anyone tell me how these two phones compare? There are some old posts that date back to December/January when these phones were just coming out ... I'm curious if anyone has any updated comparisons between these two.

    Thanks!
     
  2. sunsun

    sunsun Junior Member
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    Hi! Re. to your post.
    I am a ATT customer at the Bay Area since Jan. this year.
    I start out with a 8260 but experiencing problems for several months and at last going for the v60t and happy ever after.

    Here's some comparsion with both phone

    Sound : v60t is a sure winner on this. .... 8260 just can't catch up with that.
    Price: 8260 will be soon replaced by a newer 8265 model..... but if money is not a problem, go for v60t
    Battery life: 8260 is doing a great job about a week if not much talking.... v60t -3-4days at most only standby
    Style: v60t is a flip, and 8260 is not, so it is easy to dial a number with 8260,
    Antenna: 8260 internal easy to drop call... then the v60t, but for some reason v60t might not dial out even at
    half-full signal (only happen to me for one or two times.
    Menu: both are really good, Nokia has games.
    Alarm: Here is where I found another stupid thing with v60t, it goes off at the wrong time. and no alarm when
    v60t is off
    Keys sound: v60t will even sound when the mode is quiet.
    Charging: the v60t will shut off if u charge it when it is below one bar of battery.
    Casing: v60t is really a upper class model, 8260 is just a simple cheap plastic toy

    Can't think of any right now, but I am happy that I get the v60t instead.
    (btw. I use both phone for 2 months)
    Any questions??
     
  3. ATLguy

    ATLguy Junior Member
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    Thanks for that great response, sunsun. This is exactly the comparison that I was looking for. I have a few follow-up questions, if you don't mind:

    - Is the antenna on the V60t as cheap as some people say? I've heard mixed reviews and think most of the comments are with regard to the V60c. I know that I couldn't treat the V60 like I do my 8260 (the lack of an external antenna really makes it easy to throw that phone anywhere [​IMG] but are there any design flaws with the antenna on the V60?

    - Does the external caller ID on the V60 only display the calling number or does it list the name as it is entered in your phone/address book? I can't imagine why Motorola would list just the phone number, but that is what some reviews are saying.

    - I'm glad that you were able to compare these two phones side-by-side for a month or so. Was sound quality that much better? Do you think it was because of the external vs. internal antenna? With my 8260, I sometimes hear the battery "surge" while I am talking on the phone (it sounds like _I_ am the one being charged [​IMG] ... does the V60 have any similar buzzes or quirky noises?

    - I've hearded mixed reviews about the silver casing on the V60. Some say it is easy to scratch, while others say it is scratch resistant. What's your take on the external material.

    - What's your take on the included "holster". Will I need to buy a new one to carry it around, or is the included one good enough?

    - Finally, I've heard bad things about the one-touch dialing feature on the V60. Most people say that you cannot assign your own one-touch number to a phone number. Is this true?

    Again, thanks for the awesome response. Hopefully I'll be able to work through these issues and get a new phone by early next week.

    ATLguy
     
  4. sunsun

    sunsun Junior Member
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    sure, I don't mind at all

    1. antenna - true that you can put your 8260 anywhere you want, but i don't find any flaws with v60t's antenna. Basically, you can put it anywhere (I put mine sometimes in the back pocket... and still i didn't break it. It might be looking odd, but no problem with that at all. (v60t has the antenna improved so it doesn't break easily as the v60c(verzion).

    2. call display - don't believe what they said, they doesn't know how to use this little toy. how can a 250 dollars phone miss this feature. but one thing, if your name in the phone book is long .. it will cut out the word.... like if the name in the phone book is Sun Sun Cellular phone.... it will just display Sun Sun.

    3. Sound - personally I start out with 8260 but the bugs in it make me crazy... I keep saying ." can you hear me?" sometimes I hear the other party but not the other way... so I just change the phone. With v60t the sound is almost perfect.... but the volume is low sometimes, (don't use the included handsfree, just can't hear the other side. .. and can't hear it ^_^ what 's the use of including it if i can't use it.) except that, v60t just gives a better sound (near real voice)

    4. Case - good point. I think it is pretty good in construction and material and stuff..... wont scratch abit with keys and coins in the pocket, but if you drop like I did, it will , I promise...... ^_^ see below for more.....

    5.Holster - plz and plz and to the one million plz, don't use it if you are going to walk fast... I kinda of walking fast / run on my second day of getting this phone .... and ......>_< ..... kick on it when it falls out of the holster, roll on the ground for 12 feet !!!! yes 12 feet....!!! didn't break anything, but the back case scratch a bit... still not too much.. Get a leather case, my dad use leather case with a v8160 (verizon motorola vader) and he drops several times without a scratch... so think about getting one.... (btw, don't use the clear one for v60t on Ebay, it doesn't fit mine at all, waste me 10 bucks for that)

    6. one touch dialing - personally I use this alot with 8260 and very happy with it.... but motorola just can't keep up with this.... or say they don't have the logic for it.... if you are going to use it... thinking it twice before entering.... the first entry you enter to the phonebook will be assigned to one and you can't change it !!! I quit using this feature and instead use the voice dialing.

    Any more questions !!! ^_^
     
  5. ATLguy

    ATLguy Junior Member
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    Thanks a bunch for the follow-up and outstanding feedback on the v60. I have a funny feeling that I may have one before the end of the week. [​IMG]
     
  6. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Great discussion between 8260 and V60t. EXACTLY what informational message boards were intended to do. BTW I am a heavy cell user since 1994 (2000-3000+ minutes/month) and have had Nokia's 6160 and now the 8260 (8260 for over 1 1/2 years).

    I have a few questions about the V60t, hope you don't mind asking:

    1) is it true the VT60's alarm does NOT work when the phone is turned OFF ? Not good since I use the alarm feature every nite w/ 8260 when I sleep... and when I sleep I like to turn the phone off

    2) I love using the 8260's calculator, very useful for those spur-of-moments when I just can't seem to multiply right. How is the V60t's calculator ?
    3) can i talk w/ case/shell closed IF I started a call with the case open and am conversing w/ a headset ?
    4) can I answer the phone using a headset withOUT opening the case/shell?
    5) I love 8260's PROFILES feature, does V60t have the same feature ?
    6) In extreme noisy areas (CostCo or mall), I love being able to use my 8260's profile which I set to vibrate and ring 'loud' together (phone vibrates and it rings on loud volume at the same time), can V60t be set up to do the same (have a profile setup to ring and vibrate simultaneously) ?


    Thanks much for your help!
     
  7. ATLguy

    ATLguy Junior Member
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    This discussion actually led me to purchase the v60t. I'll try to run through your questions and answer them the best I can:

    1) V60 alarm - I'm not sure how you are able to get the 8260 alarm to work while the phone is turned off, but I'm pretty sure that the V60 alarm is not nearly as good as the 8260. It's certainly not going to work if the phone is turned off.

    2) V60 calculator: there isn't one, so I'd say the one on the 8260 is *much* better. [​IMG]

    3) Conversation with clamshell closed: YES! If you make use of the voice activated dialing, you actually don't even need to open the case to initiate a call. I tend to use my headset/earbud quite often and have found the V60 design to be very accomodating.

    4) Answering a call with clamshell closed: YES! There is a setting on the menu that allows for auto-answer whenever the headset is plugged in.

    5) "Profiles": What is it that you like best about the "profiles" that are on the 8260? The V60 allows for quick access to the ring settings/profiles (loud, soft, vibrate, etc.) while the clamshell is closed, but the setting options are not identical to the 8260.

    6) Simultaneous Ring and Vibrate: This is not available on the V60, unfortunately. The V60 actually has a ring/vibrate setting that first vibrates and then rings (it's like 2 vibrates followed by 2 rings). This is kind of annoying.

    ---

    As with any handset change (especially when you change not only models, but manufacturers), there are bound to be significant changes that take some getting used to. I never thought that I'd like the clamshell design, but I find the V60 to be much better than the 8260 in many ways -- the handset fits nicely in my hand and feels good to talk on (not always the case with the 8260), the menu is far superior (IMHO) than the Nokia, and the overall build quality just feels nicer.

    Obviously it comes down to personal preference, but I can certainly highly recommend moving to the V60 from an 8260.

    Good luck,
    ATLguy
     
  8. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Thanks for the input, I have a couple of points I'd like to clarify three points.

    1) To clarify my earlier point on 8260's alarm, if an alarm is set, the phone will be turned on if it is not already on.... the alarm then ask for "off" or "snooze' - great two features. It also asks if you want to leave the phone on or off.


    3) In terms of conversation with clamshell closed... can I START a conversation with the shell open (either answering or calling out) and then close the case and continue with the conversation with a headset ? And not using the autodial feature ?

    4) How about if the shell is closed and I have a headset on withOUT the auto answer feature turned on... can I answer a call using the headset by opening the case/shell then continue the conversation when closing the shell ?

    5) "Profiles": What I liked best about the Profiles w/ 8260 is that I have 5 pre-set profiles, one for work, one for outdoors, one for extreme noisy areas, etc... At the touch of 4-hotkey strokes (pre-set keystrokes), I can select to use whichever profile I programmed. The profiles basically are sets of preselected ring tones, ring volumes, etc.


    Maybe Motorola should be reading these boards and get what their competitors are doing better!

    Thanks for your help. This board was very useful.
     
  9. ATLguy

    ATLguy Junior Member
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    Anonymous,

    Unfortunately, I can't help you much with the alarm specifics -- my usage is limited. You might try checking motorola.com -- they have the V60 manual available for download if you'd like to check the specifics. Maybe someone else here uses the alarm more than I do and can help you out with your specific questions.

    As for the other points:

    - Yes, once a conversation is started (with the clamshell open), you can close it without hanging up on the other party ... provided, of course, that the headset is already plugged in. [​IMG]

    - I believe that you can answer a call with the clamshell closed. The V60 has a "smart key" that is on the side of the handset ... it "predicts" your next move and performs the necessary function. I haven't tried this (I'll try it over the next few days and will get back to you), but I believe the manual says you can answer a call using the smart key and a headset (with the clamshell closed).

    - As for "profiles" on the V60 ... it's even easier to change the ring type/mode/volume/etc. ... just press the volume keys (on the side) and you immediately access the "profile" menu.

    - I hope they're listening, too! [​IMG] The V60 is a great phone, although it could take some lessons from the tried-and-true 8260. For instance, I'd *love* a V60 with an internal antenna. Now that would be a cool phone. [​IMG]

    Good luck,
    ATLguy
     
  10. sunsun

    sunsun Junior Member
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    Hi Everyone , I am back from those stupid finals....... ^_^
    and to answer the question which are not answered by ATLguy
    The ALARM
    I really like the nokia 8260 alarm.... but not the V60t
    Here it is why:

    Nokia 8260
    - As you said , u do alot with it.

    Motorola v60t
    - don't turn off the phone, it won't sound!!!!
    - before the alarm wake you up, it shut itself off ( only play the melody once)
    - Third, this is really a Big bug inside the software.... the alarm goes off at the wrong time
    It might sound several hours early,... or even worst in my case, sound four days later

    Buy here is my advice
    I depends on my old 8260 for an alarm clock, but when i got the v60t
    I just need my watch and turn the phone off at night

    hope that helps
     
  11. Guest

    Guest Guest

    thanks for all the advice.
    ant advice on cases for the v60t?
     
  12. ATLguy

    ATLguy Junior Member
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    The included V60 holster really stinks -- it's awkward, it doesn't protect the phone (in case you bump into something with your hip) and it requires both hands to "lock" in the phone. I purchased the V60 leather "pouch" from Motorola for times when I need a case. The rest of the time, I just keep the V60 in my pants pocket. The pouch is nice and convenient -- it just causes the phone to stick out further from my body than I typically like. For instance, if you wear a shirt untucked, it looks like you're packing heat. [​IMG] Oh well...

    ATLguy
     
  13. Guest

    Guest Guest

    OK I finally got the V60t for Fathers Day. I definitely know there are software bugs that has been mentioned on these boards (e.g. alarm that sounds too early/late, phone hangs up when pressing different sequence of keys (volume+smart+etc.), etc.... Anyway, I am now hunting for a case and/or pouch. Decent phone so far but still not as comfortable to use as the 8260 - may need some getting used to . I already miss the calculator and the working alarm clock.
     
  14. Guest

    Guest Guest

    OK!!! Here is the skinny about the very fashionable Motorola v60.

    Mortorola v60. My biggest complaint is that the ringer on this phone is extremely poor. Any normal person that listens to the radio in their car will understand. Doesn't seem like a big problem.....until you plug in their hands free set, which is over sized. THE PHONE DOES NOT RING THROUGH THE EARPIECE!!!!! What's the point if you can't hear the phone ring in your car?! Motorola's definition of hands free set is.... you don't need to hear the phone ring while you have "our hands free set" in. But....if you really want to hear your phone ring while in your car? Why don't you buy the Motorola car adapter for only $50-130!!! Oh!!! You know that pick up/end call button on the Nokia hands free set? It's not on the Motorola hands free set. This feature is not included on any Motorolas, as far as I know. Next on my list of complaints is the "one touch dialing". For you to one touch dial you need to enter the number you or the phone assigned, enter the # key, and finally the send key. Pretty ridiculous to me. The phone also makes noises even if you do have it on silent.

    Here is my advice- DON'T get it!!!! You are better off with any of the Nokia phones. They are more realistic to peoples' needs.
     
  15. bobolito

    bobolito Diamond Senior Member
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    First, I am surprised that Motorola who is the father of holsters made such a bad design for the v60 holster. Also, I found it hillarious that alarm bug where it goes off before time. Just imagine if you have to get up at 7 AM and the alarm goes of at 4:30AM ...lol...was this some kind of a joke from Motorola?

    Also, I have to dissagree with those who claim that just because a phone has an internal antenna it will have worse reception. I did a side by side comparison/test during last year with the 3360, the 8260 and a 5160 as well as a Talkabout P8097 which are all TDMA phones for the AT&T network. The reception in -dB was exactly the same on all phones when they were located in the same spot. As a matter of fact, after months of testing the 8260 and 3360 with their internal antennas had the least number of dropped calls and outperformed the Motorola 8097 and the 5160 for the lower bit error rates even with signals between -103dB and -109dB as the calls were still clear even with such a weak signal. The Motorola 8097 and the 5160 were useless with signals that weak. Internal antennas are very popular and Nokia wouldn't be having such a success with them if they had reception problems.

    Some people complain about the hiss heard on the 8260. This is true until you get used to it. It is actually very faint. The 3360 doesn't emit this noise.

    If I had to complain about the 8260, I would say that the ringer is not as loud as I would want it to be. If I placed the phone in my pocket, the clothing would eat up the ring sound completely and I would miss calls. Also, some people's voice simply distorts too easily if they speak on to the 8260. Especially if you have a high pitched or squeaky voice, I would not recommend them talking into this phone's microphone. You will blow up people's ears. The person on the other end will have to take the earpiece away because you'll sound like a bird being tortured! unless you speak very softly. The 5160 has the same problem with the microphone. Also, some people say the 8260 it's too small...hehe. (In the race for the smallest phone Nokia went too far this time) although it's just fine for me. On the other hand, battery life is great for the size of this phone. The phone can go just over three hours talktime with the extended battery and about 3-4 days standby with normal use before requiring recharge.

    About the 3360, my complaint is that it doesn't have a power-on lock code like the 8260 to prevent unauthorized use (minus points for Nokia on that one). The headset won't sound as loud as when you plug it into the 8260 (bad when you are driving in a noisy car). Also, the keys are harder to press. On the other hand, the ringer is mad loud, the loudest Nokia I've seen. People with high pitched/squeaky voice speaking into the 3360 microphone won't distort as easily when they are heard in the other end due to the improved sound processing. The phone processor seems to react faster to user input and feedback, it has more memory to store numbers (2 per contact) and to store more ringtones than the 8260. Battery life is comparable to the 8260 with the extended battery. 3hrs 42mins talktime in my test with the extended battery.
     
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  16. Guest

    Guest Guest

    I completely agree with anonymous' (the last one) post - I just switched from an 8260 with Cingular to a V60T with AT&T and am *very* unhappy with the decision. I've had this phone for a month and I just cannot get used to it. I learn quickly, but this phone is simply poor. I was really pumped at first, since the V60 *IS* such a pretty little thing, but honestly, it's all form and no function.

    How about volume? The earbud, speaker, and ringer are all pathetic. I hear my 8260 most of the time - the V60T's max ring volume is so quiet you might as well not even have it on. Trying to talk to people in the car using the earbud? Forget it. You'll get in an accident just trying to figure out what they're saying.

    The vibrate-then-ring option, mentioned earlier, is also annoying.

    About the alarm.. there pretty much IS no alarm on the V60. I already miss my 8260's alarm madly. You go through a ludicrously complex process to set the alarm as an "event," whereas with the 8260 you press 9 easy buttons from the main screen and you're there. And half the time you don't notice the alarm on the V60 because it's so quiet, and the alarm only sounds once.

    This phone's menus aren't well designed either. Although they do give you the option to rearrange them to your liking, I still can't really find anything.

    And let's not even discuss reception. I'm just going to assume it's a problem with the carrier, and not the phone.

    Seems like this product was rushed to market so Motorola could get a few suckers to bite before they came out with a better designed phone. Bottom line, if you're used to Nokia, STICK with Nokia... I don't know what I'm going to do, but I'm hoping to wait til AT&T gets GSM out here (chicago) and spring for the 8390.

    That day will not come fast enough.
     
  17. bobolito

    bobolito Diamond Senior Member
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    It's no secret that Motorola phones are a bit more complex to use and the learning curve is steeper than other brands. I personally never got used to the Talkabout T8097 that I used to have. I had to concentrate so much on navigating through the Talkabout menus that I had to stop whatever else I was doing. Sometimes I inadvertently dropped calls by pressing the wrong button by mistake. I consider myself a quick learner but getting used to the Talkabout was a challenge. I never had to consult the manual to learn how to use my first Nokia and I can use it with my eyes closed. Maybe Motorola needs some help from Apple Computer to learn how to design intuitive and user-friendly software interfaces.
     
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  18. ATLguy

    ATLguy Junior Member
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    For what it's worth, I *love* the Motorola V60 menu structure/layout. Making a quick pass through the menu, here's what you've got:

    - Recent Calls
    - Phonebook
    - Datebook
    - Messages
    - Shortcuts
    - Voicenotes
    - Browser
    - Settings

    Unfortunately, I don't have a Nokia in front of me to do a side-by-side comparison, but from what I recall, the Nokia really isn't all that different. On the Nokia menus, they have Call Log (same as Recent Calls), Phonebook, Calendar (same as Datebook), Messages, Settings, etc.

    Are they really all that different?

    Using the Motorola, I feel like I have more control over my phone ... there are menu options that give me access to ESN information and SID/SOC settings. Nokia doesn't expose this kind of stuff to users. Aside from the "extra" information on the Moto, I find that there really isn't too much difference between the two brands ... at least at the top-level menu.

    ATLguy
     
  19. bobolito

    bobolito Diamond Senior Member
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    There are quite some differences:

    The Nokia 8260 menu:

    1. Messages (For SMS and email and voicemail setup)
    2. Call Log
    3. Profiles (I believe the V60 doesnt have this)
    4. Settings
    5. System (To search for available networks. Pretty much useless because the phone does this automatically)
    6. Games
    7. Calculator (V60 doesnt have this)
    8. Calendar
    9. Keyguard (V60 doesnt have this)
    10. Field Test (If active. Not something a regular user uses but much easier to access and read than in the V60)

    The phonebook is easily accessed by pressing the up or down keys. No need to enter a menu.
    One of the things I love about the 8260 phonebook is the way you can save a new number. Just enter the number from the main screen and press the "save" soft key. Other phonebook features are accessible from the "Names " soft key.

    To switch from ring to vibration or any other mode you had configured, press the power button and select from the menu.
    To jump from any menu, no matter how deep you are, to the main screen just press the "End" button. Just a single button press.
    To enter a tree-way call, while in a call, enter the new number and press send, wait for ring, then send again.

    The SID, SOC, etc are not easily visible like in the V60 but that's not a regular user function. With either phone, you have to enter programming mode anyway to change any of those.

    Making a call with a calling card is very straight forward. Enter the number or choose from the phonebook, then just press and hold send and the phone dials the calling card access number, then press OK to automatically send the card number, then OK again to send the destination number. Of course the card number and the access number have to be saved in the calling card menu which is very easy to use also.

    You can save strings containing dialing Pause and Wait commands which makes checking your voicemail very simple to program and use. No need to use complicated string linking functions. Just type the sequence all in one line. When cheking voicemail press and hold 1; the phone sends voicemail access number first (which is my own number), then waits a few seconds depending on how many pauses I inserted, then sends the digit to access voicemail, then the password with no user intervention. All with a single keypress.

    When the screen reads missed calls, just press the "List" soft key and it shows you the last caller. Then you can scroll to see the next missed call.

    On the other hand, one thing I find awkward to setup is associating a graphic to a caller group. But I don't think this applies to the subject.

    These are some of the things that make the 8260 easier for me to use in my opinion. I'm sure there are more. Maybe I just got used to Nokias but I spent months with a Motorola flip phone and never got used to it. I found it more awkward to get to the essential functions. However, I got used to my first Nokia in just days. I just think they are more intuitive and straight forward in the menu structure design and feature ease of access. Just my 2 cents.
     
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  20. ATLguy

    ATLguy Junior Member
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    Regarding some previous comments on the 8260 and V60, I'll try to clarify a few things based on my experience with both phones. Regardless of what I say in this post, I actually love both phones -- in terms of voice clarity, durability, and ease-of-use, I'd give them equal marks. I have come to prefer the Motorola software over that on the Nokia, but that's just a personal preference. In terms of functionality:

    On the V60, the "Messages" menu allows for SMS, e-mail, voicemail, and "quicknotes" (a Moto feature that allows for simple note-keeping)

    On the V60, the "Recent Calls" menu performs the exact same function - tracks received calls, dialed calls, contains a notepad, and call timers.

    The V60 does not have Profile settings that are nearly as nice as the 8260. What the Moto does have is Ring Styles: loud, soft, vibrate, vibe&ring, silent. Although you can associate any ring with any ring style, it just isn't nearly as nice as the renameable, fully-customizable profiles on the 8260.

    Also on the V60, with submenus: Ring Styles, Phone Status, Connection, In-Call Setup, Security, Other Settings.

    On the V60, a similar feature can be found under the Settings Menu.

    NO games or calculators on the V60.

    On the V60, we have the "Datebook".

    Actually, the V60 doesn't need this since it's a flip ... but you already knew that. [​IMG]

    I don't even know what this is... [​IMG]

    The Moto actually performs in much the same way. The "rocker" keys on the left side can be activated (and are by default) to control access to the phonebook. Just press the up or down key and your there. Also, the V60 allows you to enter a number from the main screen and press the "store" soft key.

    Similar. On the V60, just press the "rocker" keys again and use the "smart key" to scroll through your available ring modes. Three-way calling also the same.

    Never made a calling card call from my cell phone, so I can't attest to how this works.

    Exactly the same on the V60. Nothing different -- pause and wait keys are available to use, and 1 is one-touch access to voicemail. On the V60, you can also program Voice Dialing to connect you to your phonebook (ohhhhh, ahhhhh [​IMG]

    Same.

    What I love about the V60 is that its highly configurable. You can change what menus your soft keys access, you've got voice dialing and the menu structure is easily changed through setup. Also, "Shortcuts" allow you to assign immediate 2-key access to any submenu item.

    All-in-all, I honestly think that these phones are nearly identical. They have most of the same features and just SLIGHTLY different menu structures. What it all comes down to is whether or not you like the flip or candybar style phone. And, of course, $$$. But that's always an issue, right? :
     
  21. UntetheredGuy

    UntetheredGuy New Member

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    I tried to switch from the 8260 to the V60t but went back.

    Reception/call quality on the V60 was not really any better than my 8260, and it seemed to have more trouble dialing out even when signal strength appeared to be OK.

    The V60 does not have an alarm, and my 8260 has become my alarm clock of choice. There is a way to do a workaround and use the calendar feature as a alarm but it is second rate. As noted by others, the alarm does not work if the phone is off. Also, the alarm will only sound once, so you may sleep through it. You can't snooze either.

    Battery life on the V60 did not seem as good as the 8260.

    I found the V60 form factor with the external antenna to be more bulky/less elegant than the 8260. Also, the external antenna did not seem to improve RF performance, so why pay the price?

    Another ding - the V60 had much better analog performance, but then it wouldn't consistently switch back to digital mode in places where the 8260 would. Given that analog calls are "scratchy" even in good signal strength areas, I found this irritating.

    Finally, I found the V60 text messaging user interface to be much harder to use than the 8260. I'm a moderate user of text messaging, so this was disappointing.

    Ultimately, I went back to by 8260.
     
  22. bobolito

    bobolito Diamond Senior Member
    Senior Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
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    My Phone:
    iPhone SE
    Wireless Provider(s):
    T-Mobile
    This really depends more on the provider than the phone itself.
    I have found that Nokias handle weak signals better than Motorolas. But I can't say this has anything to do with the antenna. Some people claim that retractable or stub antennas perform better than internal. However, what's really happening is that retractable antennas have decreased their common sense. If they see that the indicator jumps from 2 to 3 bars for a split second, they think it is the antenna. Frankly, RF reception is more complicated than that and there are much more variables involved than just the type of antenna.

    While I believe they both have about the same reception, the variance between them is too small to blame anything in particular for the differences, but most likely they can be attributed to the quality of the components inside because their ability to decode a weak signal is different and tends to be less reliable as the phone gets older.
    Recent digital phones are optimized for digital performance, and in the process they de-optimized analog reception. Maybe they do this to discourage people from forcing their phones to analog. Therefore, digital phones performance in analog will likely dissapoint anyone. If you use an old Nokia analog phone, you'll find its reception quality is much better and audio is much clear rivaling landline phones.

    ATLGuy, the Field Test is a screen where you can monitor reception quality and gives you a lot of info about the network such as bit error, cell site ID, control channel number, system band, neighboring towers signal strength (3360 only), signal strength transmitting, signal strength received, system ID, etc. I am sure the V60 has something like this and I think Motorola calls it Test Mode, but to access it I think you have to dial #TESTMODE#....not sure though.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  23. ATLguy

    ATLguy Junior Member
    Junior Member

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    Ohhhhh ... that's what Test Mode is used for ... I'll have to try it out sometime. Thanks for the info. [​IMG]
     

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