Welcome to Our WirelessAdvisor Community!

You are viewing our forums as a GUEST. Please join us so you can post and view all the pictures.
Registration is easy, fast and FREE!

Prolonging battery life

Discussion in 'GENERAL Wireless Discussion' started by viewfly, Oct 23, 2006.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. viewfly

    viewfly Mobile RF Advisor
    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2003
    Messages:
    6,003
    Likes Received:
    854
    My Phone:
    iPhone XS Space Grey
    Wireless Provider(s):
    AT&T; Tmobile SIM only
    Yes, it is the current drawn divided into the mAh, to determine battery duration, in hours. But it is always confirmed experimentally, and normally separately. One for constant talk time, and one for constant standby time. The combined, if even given, is an agreed upon combination of the two. Clearly it varies with the actual use. Also, it varies with how strong the radio signal is to the phone. I think that a very good signal is assumed to give the 'best' numbers.

    Each phone consumes different amounts of battery power. If you can actually change the battery to a larger one, it would be linear, for the most part, that is a 1000mAh battery should give 2x the talk/standby time as a 500mAh one.

    Hope that this is clear.
     
  2. viewfly

    viewfly Mobile RF Advisor
    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2003
    Messages:
    6,003
    Likes Received:
    854
    My Phone:
    iPhone XS Space Grey
    Wireless Provider(s):
    AT&T; Tmobile SIM only
    Attached is a link to an interesting and informative video from Apple's MacBook Pro web page on their new batteries for the Macbook. Discusses their philosophy for having a non replaceable battery. The new battery in the Macbook lasts 7 hours, recharges 1000x (instead of 300x) and should last 5 years(instead of 2 or so). Probably the same philosophy for the iphone and ipod line ups arriving.

    Apple - MacBook Pro - Meet the new MacBook Pro family. See or click on the part that says "watch the Battery video".

    Very interesting.
     
  3. viewfly

    viewfly Mobile RF Advisor
    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2003
    Messages:
    6,003
    Likes Received:
    854
    My Phone:
    iPhone XS Space Grey
    Wireless Provider(s):
    AT&T; Tmobile SIM only
    Non OEM batteries not up to snuff!

    What we always suspected! -VF

    Are third-party cell phone battery manufacturers deceiving their customers?

    1400mAh. 2500mAh! 10 million mAh! Ah-ah-ah!

    The vast majority of consumers don’t have a clue as to what those little numbers on their cell phones battery mean. Like with processor clock speeds and television refresh rates, we all tend to just assume that bigger numbers = better product. So when Joe Consumer sees some third-party manufacturer touting their batteries with ratings double that of what the official battery offers, it seems like a killer deal.

    Alas, it appears that some of these third-party manufacturers might be pulling the oldest marketing trick in the world: flat-out lying.


    Armed with a nothing but a fancy battery testing suite and a desire for honesty, a gent named Doug Simmons set out to put third-party battery ratings to the test. He asked his online cohorts to loan him their third-party wares, and the brawl began.

    His findings? While OEM batteries are clocking in at right around the promised rating, third-party batteries.. aren’t.

    Now, no one really expects the “official” batteries sold on eBay to be.. you know, official. And they most certainly aren’t. Pitched as being one-to-one matches with the real deal, some of these bootlegs are failing to perform even half as well as the original.

    That part’s obvious. You get what you pay for. But it goes beyond eBay: even amongst the (fairly pricey) batteries of some of the more well-known third parties (like Seido, or Mugen), Doug is seeing discrepancies left and right. Take Seido’s 1600mAh replacement for the Nexus One, for example. The battery is pitched as being about 14% stronger than the Nexus One’s original 1400mAh battery (which, by the way, tested at a very acceptable 1357mAh) — but in Doug’s tests, this “bigger” battery is actually clocking in at a lower capacity (1317mAh) than the original.

    Doug’s only tested around a dozen batteries so far, but the results are eye opening; while the OEM batteries are almost always reasonably accurate to their promised rating, the third-party batteries are consistently 20-30% weaker than advertised. Check out his results so far here — and if you’ve got a new-condition battery for him to take a crack at, be sure to get in touch.
     
  4. viewfly

    viewfly Mobile RF Advisor
    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2003
    Messages:
    6,003
    Likes Received:
    854
    My Phone:
    iPhone XS Space Grey
    Wireless Provider(s):
    AT&T; Tmobile SIM only
  5. broctherock

    broctherock New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2010
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    1
    My Phone:
    HTC EVO
    Wireless Provider(s):
    Sprint
    Another way to increase the battery life during the day is to use a Signal Booster. When the phone has a stronger signal it doesnt have to work as hard to get back to the tower and the batery is not worn down. I have a Wilson Sleek Booster and it works very well.
     
    #65 broctherock, Aug 19, 2010
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 19, 2010
  6. Jay2TheRescue

    Jay2TheRescue Resident Spamslayer
    Super Moderator Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2002
    Messages:
    12,403
    Cell Tower Picture Gallery:
    158
    Likes Received:
    435
    Location:
    Northern Virginia
    My Phone:
    Pixel 4a 5G
    Wireless Provider(s):
    AT&Tingular 310-410
    I too had to replace the battery in my StarTac, and my V60 was barely limping along when I bought my V551. Looks like you had several of the same phones I did. The battery technology has changed a lot since those days though. My V551's still hold a charge almost as good as when they were new, but I have an awful time with my V3's. My V3's (I have about a dozen of them) need new batteries every year. My guess is that in order to make the phone small and slim, they put an undersized battery in it that gets toasted quickly.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page

Copyright 1997-2022 Wireless Advisor™, LLC. All rights reserved. All registered and unregistered trademarks are the property of their respective holders.
WirelessAdvisor.com is not associated by ownership or membership with any cellular, PCS or wireless service provider companies and is not meant to be an endorsement of any company or service. Some links on these pages may be paid advertising or paid affiliate programs.

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice