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Number of Calls a Tower Box can Hold?

Discussion in 'GENERAL Wireless Discussion' started by Medic7, Jul 5, 2006.

  1. Medic7

    Medic7 New Member

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    Anyone know the number of calls a single box on a cellular tower can hold? I know a little about cellular workings, and from what I know, on a tower there are boxes and in each box that has a certain number of ???? that each hold one single call from a user. But I'm finding this is a trade secret or such? Doing a search I've never found a number, and when I spoke with a Tech. guy from Nextel (I was lucky to literally bump into one at a Nextel store) his answer was evasive "I can't say" however he did tell me the exact location of towers of Nextel, so I don't think it was his personality as he was friendly, but refused to give info on the boxes.

    Ideas here?
     
  2. alltelwirelesstech

    alltelwirelesstech Senior Member
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    only reason i can say he did not tell you would be that each site varies. there is no set number on a site. it will vary depending on the router, trunks, and switch of the area it is serving
     
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  3. Medic7

    Medic7 New Member

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    Right. OK. Then what is a ballpark number a box can hold? Say the min and max?

    I also remember him saying how the handset the call goes to the tower, then up to Syracuse, NY, then on the phonelines.
     
  4. hillbilly44

    hillbilly44 Senior Member
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    Medic;

    Here goes, first the "box" you're referring to is called a BTS or base station. The base station can hold as few as 1 radio to as many as 72 radios. The radios are what allows your mobile phone to make a call (it's basically a glorified radio). A "radio" can handle a number of calls based on the technology used. Example an analog radio can handle approximately 2 "phone" calls, a digital radio can handle as few as 4 and as many as 20 calls. I think you can go to some of WA's links to find out more about the technology. Also the reason the tech wouldn't tell you such information is it's considered confidential.;)
     
  5. wirles

    wirles I'm baaaaaaaaaack
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    Cell Site/BTS:
    Within the cell, the user communicates with the system via the Base Transceiver Station (BTS). Each cell has one BTS, a tower which contains radio transceivers and antenna, a processor, channel cards, and other equipment necessary for providing service in the cell. The capacity of a BTS/cell is determined by the number of available channels, cell sectorization, and caller demand (typically measured in Erlangs). The Base Station Controller (BSC) Each BTS is controlled by a base station controller (BSC); one BSC typically manages several BTSs. A BSC contains a high capacity switch, and provides crucial services required for controlling the BTSs, including managing call handoffs from one cell to the next and administering radio resource. The capacity of a BSC is limited by the number of ransmission ports they have to communicate with the transceivers from the BTSs. BSCs are typically loaded at 80% of capacity.81 The BSC has a direct trunk link to the BTS, typically via a T-1 line.

    For more info, just google "cellular system capacity" I am sure you will be occupied for as long as it retains your interest.
     
  6. Medic7

    Medic7 New Member

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    There we go!
    Thanks guys. I thought it was confidential. But just why is it?
     
  7. wirles

    wirles I'm baaaaaaaaaack
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    The way technology and system designs work is not confidential. What is private is the specific channel use scheme used by the carrier.
     
  8. Medic7

    Medic7 New Member

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    Thanks again.
    I'm probably missing something here. But unless it's something that the other company(s) don't know how to do that gives them an advantage over another, why is it private? Or is that the case?
     
  9. wirles

    wirles I'm baaaaaaaaaack
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    It isn't that they don't know how....they don't know how each does it specifically. There are set ways to design, but the specific desgn is confidential. Sort of a corporate strategy type of thing. It isn't like they don't have RF and Transport Engineers that work for a consulting company that places them with T-Mobile for one project, and Cingular for the next ;)

    I know my engineers would be moved around constantly from project to project and carrier assignment to carrier assignment.
     

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