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New phone - quad or tri band

Discussion in 'T-Mobile Forum' started by rjniles, Mar 6, 2009.

  1. rjniles

    rjniles Junior Member
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    I am switching to T-Mobile to get the UMA Hot Spot calling and T-Mobile at Home features. As such I need a UMA capable handset. I am interested in voice calling only and have decided between the Samsung t339 and the Nokia 7510. The Nokia is a quad band phone and the Samsung is tri band (no 900 Mhtz). My question is- will the lack of the 900 Mhtz band be a limitation of any significance? I live in Geogetown county South Carolina (former Suncomm territory) Seems that T-Mobile only uses 1900 Mhtz in this area, but will the lack of 900 hurt my coverage while traveling?
     
  2. charlyee

    charlyee Ultimate Insanity
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    The lack of 900 MHz will not be a limitation in North America. The 900 and 1800 MHZ bands are used in Europe and Asia only.
     
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  3. M in LA

    M in LA Mobile 28 Years Plus
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    You're covered in the US with the tri-band Samsung phone because it has the two American frequencies. The 900mhz band is not necessary here. If you decide to travel to Europe, not having the 900 band would work against you, but that's it. Whichever phone you choose will work fine.
     
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  4. Telekom

    Telekom Bronze Senior Member
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    Unless you are going overseas it makes no difference at all.

    900 is the primary GSM frequency in use in Europe, Asia and Africa. Very few places in the Americas use 900 (Cuba and Venezuela are at least two.) Most other places in the Americas use 850 and 1900 with a few places in South America (like Brazil) use 1800.
     

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