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Is there such thing as a analog GSM phone?

Discussion in 'Western US Wireless Forum' started by lagreca, Feb 5, 2003.

  1. lagreca

    lagreca New Member

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    Is there such thing as a analog GSM phone? I was talking to a cingular rep on the phone tonight about using their pre-paid service while in Guam. He told me it would work, but cost $2-3/minute. Then I asked about text messaging and he said it probably wouldn't work because it might not be digital over there. Then I got to thinking, do they even make any analog GSM phones? Because thats what I was inquiring about, their pre-paid GSM service. Thanks for your info.
     
  2. budney

    budney Resident Headbanger
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    The only phone that I know of for Cingular that works on both systems is the Nokia 6340i. The phone works in GSM/TDMA/AMPS. It is not sold in the western US. You may be able to pick one up on eBay or may be a friend or relative back east can get one for you. Then take it in to Cingular were you live to activate it for there prepaid service.
     
  3. xtoddler2

    xtoddler2 Junior Member
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    Cingular does not have roaming on GSM phones. GSM phones can not operate on any other technology then GSM, there is absolutely no analog what-so-ever on GSM. Notice in Europe, and other countries, if you roam, its on another GSM provider, whos area is slightly bigger, or has a different market that covers, where the previous does not.

    As for Guam, try Sprint PCS, they have a plan for roaming, if you are within a selected test market, then you can sign up for a roaming service for $10 a month, that allows you to use half your calls off network, provided the other half are on network. It will roam in Sprint, CDMA Digital (Verizon OR ATT, and many others) and analog. It includes long distance, and the roaming fees, so you are not charged when calling from Guam to the US, and you are never charged long distance for calls to your phone. Service plan minutes apply, and you must have your phone set up in a market area who offers this plan

    If you are thinking anyone else, ask ATT, or even T-Mobile if there is Guam service, but as far as I know they are CDMA, so Verizon could be your best bet in the longer run

    Roger
     
  4. ockidd15

    ockidd15 Senior Member
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    A few years ago, Voicestream's 5190 and 6190 Nokia phones had an optional analog module that you would attach onto the back of the phone if you needed an analog signal. Of course they would charge you extra for those minutes used in analog mode.
     
  5. ZaphodB

    ZaphodB Signal Go Down De Hole...
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    There are a bunch of phones sold by Fido (err...Microcell) in Canada that are GSM with an analog module that is essentially a thicker battery pack. If you've ever been to British Columbia and gone out of the range of Vancouver metro, you'll know why it's obligatory to have analog coverage.
     
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  6. roamer1

    roamer1 In Memoriam
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    Ericsson CF888 (long discontinued) is GSM+analog in the same phone, no module required.

    The GAIT phones Cingular sells do analog, but of course they don't sell them in CA yet [​IMG]

    -SC
     
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  7. CommuteMan

    CommuteMan Junior Member
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    If you're looking for a phone to use while travelling, don't forget this option:

    1) Buy an unlocked GSM phone that will work where you are going (you need to understand phone service and providers in Guam). GSM works in most countries of the world, but not all.....

    2) Get a prepaid SIM card when you get there.

    This will give you a local number, and much lower rates.

    For example, I was in New Zealand a month ago, and knew I needed to make and receive a lot of calls while there. I could have used my ATT GSM phone for $1-$2/minute (depending on the long distance component ) and everyone in NZ would need to pay for a call to the US to reach me.

    I have an unlocked Nokia 6310i that I bought from a supplier on eBay for about $50 over ATT's "subsidized" price.

    In NZ, I bought a Vodafone pre-paid SIM for ~US$17. This gave me a local number. Calls within NZ cost me ~US$0.30/min, and incoming calls were free. I could top up the prepay at ATMs or gas stations all over the country. Based on my usage over about 3 weeks, I just about paid for the Nokia (compared to using ATT international roaming).

    I also took my ATT SIM with me, and I could drop it into the Nokia anytime I wanted to make business calls to the US that would be paid aspart of my regular bill.

    CM
     
  8. lagreca

    lagreca New Member

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    Actually thats what prompted this very question. I was looking at prepaid GSM cards on ebay. Someone had a Cingular card for sale, and I was inquiring whether it would work in Guam. I even called Cingular because there wasn't a good way to get ahold of them on their website. The CSR who I talked to had NO IDEA what he was talking about. He said the card would work in Guam, but be $2-3/minute. He also said he didnt know if text messaging would work because that would require digital. I figured that if a GSM card would work there, it would have to be digital.

    I really dont think he had a clue as to what he was talking about. I asked to speak to someone else who actually knew, and was transfered to nowhere.........when I finally hung up. I figured I was just wasting my time. After all I've had Cingular before, and I know what TERRIBLE service they offer. Their CSR's are completely incompetent, etc.......
     
  9. northform

    northform Bronze Senior Member
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    Guam has a very built out GSM network. xtoddler2, GSM can do analog as much as CDMA can. Try the Nokia 6340i or the SonyEricsson T62u. They support analog, TDMA and GSM. CDMA doesn't support analog any more than GSM does. I'm sure you've seen the single band Sprint phones. Analog is an add on to a CDMA phone just like it is to a GSM phone. It is more common in CDMA phones because the US, where cellular coverage is almost nowhere compared to Europe, was the primary market. In Europe, GSM's primary market, there was no reason to add analog capabilities to GSM phones since at least one provider and usually two had 99% GSM coverage. The US GSM market was under 6 million with only one provider per market so there wasn't a push to make GSM phones support analog, until now.
     
  10. bobolito

    bobolito Diamond Senior Member
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    Northform, as i have stated many times, GSM and Analog run on two separate networks. Therefore, it is more difficult to build analog capability into a GSM phone than it is to a CDMA phone. CDMA and analog run ON THE SAME network and have gotten along since day one, unlike GSM. Therefore, automatic roaming is much easier to implement for carriers because no extra add-ons are required on the network side. CDMA/Analog interoperability is done without any network upgrades. However, GSM/Analog interoperability requires the two networks to talk to each other via a gateway. This is much more costly and more difficult to get to work. In fact, it is still not working 100% of the times. Why do you think that there are so many CDMA/analog phones and only two GAIT phones? Cingular is the only carrier that has phones that operate on both networks with AT&T to follow when the technology is more reliable. However, CDMA/Analog interoperability has been around since the birth of CDMA. Even before CDMA was popular, it already had support for analog. Why? because they run on the same network, therefore it was easy to add.

    By the way, older GSM phones that supported analog (which were very unpopular) needed a hardware add-on which was quite expensive, not to mention that you had to turn off the phone to switch modes. This was never required with CDMA phones. In fact, CDMA CAN HANDOFF TO ANALOG on the same call (but not the other way around) so that tells you who has better analog support.

    Nowadays, thanks to GAIT, phones that support both networks are possible. They are not referred to as "GSM phones that support analog", they are known as GAIT phones.
     
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  11. ockidd15

    ockidd15 Senior Member
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    Haha yeah I remember the prices of those analog hardware add-ons for the older GSM phones. They were even more expensive than the phone itself sometimes...
     

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