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iRant: connecting to an airport hotspot

Discussion in 'APPLE iPhone, iPad Tablets and all iOS Devices' started by dmapr, Aug 26, 2017.

  1. dmapr

    dmapr Silver Senior Member
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    While at the CPH airport today both my wife's and my step-daughter's iPhones would happily lock onto the hotspot network only to come to a grinding halt. With my step-daughter we didn't have time to troubleshoot so I just gave her my Danish SIM and sent her on her merry way. With my wife it was easier since I had my Nexus with me which allowed me to log on and google the following link: http://mashtips.com/solve-wi-fi-login-page-not-loading-issue-ios/. But I've got to say, this is a far cry from the "it just works" iMantra…
     
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  2. charlyee

    charlyee Ultimate Insanity
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    Oh those Danes, I have to talk my Danish friend on how difficult they are making a tourist's life. Lol

    Seriously though, I have had the same thing happen twice with my iPhone, I believe the second one was in Istanbul, don't remember where the first one was.

    Unlike you, I decided to go to my iPad Kindle app instead of trouble shooting. Thank you for the instruction, I will save them for future and yes it doesn't always "just work".

    EDIT: The first time was with my BB 9700 and I think it was designed to connect to free public wifi, that was the BIS BES days.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
    #2 charlyee, Aug 26, 2017
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2017
  3. dmapr

    dmapr Silver Senior Member
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    I wish I had that luxury :D
     
  4. viewfly

    viewfly Mobile RF Advisor
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    Can't say that I had the same experience often with my iPhone. Most times it just works. On an airplane last month I did have some problems, but after a few tries it worked itself out. Clearly the IT server group has the problem in their court.

    I note at the bottom of the link it. Has another useful tip:

    Even though we demonstrated this workaround with iPhone, the same solution is applicable for the Android phone. This solution will work any public Wi-Fi that reluctant to load the authentication or login page on your smartphone.


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  5. palandri

    palandri Former Palm Guy

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    I was shown that trick by an IT guy a few years back at a hospital I was working at here in Chicago when I was having trouble connecting to the hospital wifi. It's a pretty slick trick and I've used it a few times.
     
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  6. dmapr

    dmapr Silver Senior Member
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    Sure, it will also work with a computer. It's just that it happened to her several times before at different airports and never to me

    Before I just told her to disconnect Wi-Fi and use the cellular data since it was at various US airports and I never bothered to look any deeper than that until now.

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  7. viewfly

    viewfly Mobile RF Advisor
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    Good tip and I'll keep an eye out for it. In the last months, I didn't have any problems connecting to airport wifi's in NY, CA, Boston and some
    small Caribbean islands with our iPhones and iPads. Nor any store/shop wifi, and on the airplane. I let the server sign-in page come up from the settings page before going to safari directly. That can take awhile even though the wifi icon shows a connection first.

    Most times a cellular connection is faster anyways. The $10/day ATT international feature was great to have recently.


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    #7 viewfly, Aug 28, 2017
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2017
  8. dmapr

    dmapr Silver Senior Member
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    I've enabled the $10/day for this trip but ended up not using it. The Danish SIM was much cheaper if used for more than one day and in Norway we were all together all the time so we managed without any service.

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  9. viewfly

    viewfly Mobile RF Advisor
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    Good for you!

    You bring up using local SIM's every time I mention ATT international plans.

    Using local SIMS are not universally the best solution for all people and situations. Being reachable on your stateside phone number ( calls, txt messages), for some situations, is mandatory, and cannot always be pre-planed. Some, but not exhaustive, are work related, medical, credit card fraud alerts, emergencies, travel changes...and call forwarding is not always reliable.


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  10. dmapr

    dmapr Silver Senior Member
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    I fully expected to use the plan this time, just didn't happen. In Norway it would have made more sense than a local SIM. And yes, I did use the call forwarding and I got every one of the calls made to my stateside number. I've never had a problem with call forwarding, this is the first time I hear it's not reliable. I always forward to a US number, never internationally.

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  11. viewfly

    viewfly Mobile RF Advisor
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    That's good to know. My experience is from years ago, when international arrangements when not so smooth.

    Still I can't risk not getting a message, or having complicated phone connections because I ( or my company) was trying to save a few bucks.


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  12. dmapr

    dmapr Silver Senior Member
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    My understanding of call forwarding the risk of not getting a message is the same, your phone either forwards to a VM center or to a different number, which in my case also comes with a VM capability. The more important aspect is missing text messages, but those are not guaranteed to begin with. You can go on a weeklong trip to Zion and end up missing a bunch of text messages just because you didn't have the signal for a week. Also for me it is important not only how much I'm saving myself (which in some cases could be as much as a couple of hundred $$) but also people who need to be in touch with me. Since I often either travel with a group of friends or to an area full of local people I need to stay in contact with, not having a local SIM means they have to pay extra too. As you said, it's not universally better and/or more convenient and in case of Norway it wasn't. We would have used the $10/day in case of emergency, but it never came to that.
     
  13. viewfly

    viewfly Mobile RF Advisor
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    Yeah, still not convinced that works for me. The people I travel with all do the same as me because we all have our different circle of contacts to connect with from home and work. Text messages have a higher chance of getting through with weak signals too.

    As far as the people I travel with, we just talk face to face or text. Local international phone calls are not a large part of the venue. The $10 are unlimited SMS texting back home, and US phone to US phone, even overseas. iMessage or WhatsApps are just data, from my 15Gb US plan. It's a great and convenient plan for me. I don't have to think about it at all.

    Tell me what you actually do. If 15 US guys visited a Germany work center, and we all gave the local manager 15 new temporary local phone numbers, I think he be a bit annoyed that he couldn't use what was already in his local contact list. I get the call forwarding for your US people part.


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    #13 viewfly, Aug 29, 2017
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2017
  14. dmapr

    dmapr Silver Senior Member
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    LOL, I'm not trying to convince you to do it, I'm mentioning it so other people may decide what they want to do. A lot of people with T-Mobile for instance just opt for the free EDGE speed data and that makes them happy enough.

    When we visited our Israeli office we used local SIMs and gave the numbers to our colleagues saying "In addition to using the work communication systems you can reach us on these numbers" and vice versa. When I'm in US we basically limit all communication methods to the internal tools, we don't use the cellphones. So I'm not sure how your work example corresponds to my work example.

    For traveling as a group with friends we just exchange the local numbers, it's not that annoying and takes a couple of minutes to do. As I said before it makes a lot more sense on longer trips, but for example on our trip to Croatia last fall I spent about $15 for a week of local cell service between my wife and I instead of paying $20/day for a total of $140. It also made calling local cabs/restaurants/etc. much easier since not every place has Uber/online reservations/whatnot.

    And in Russia of course I just pop in a local SIM and use all my Russian contacts normally — be it texting or calling. I use Hangouts to make calls/send texts back to US.
     
  15. viewfly

    viewfly Mobile RF Advisor
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    Yes, it depends on the length of stay, but I'm hopefully never in an airport for more than a day, so if wifi is not working, or slow and overloaded, I choose the $10 cellular plan.

    I guess a large corporation works differently. Buying local SIMs is unheard of unless it's a permanent transfer. The company alway happily reimburses, since it is far less expensive than hotel calls, and more productive.

    Just curious, where to you pick up a SIM for each country, or do you order from home? And where?


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  16. palandri

    palandri Former Palm Guy

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    It's too bad that dual SIM card phones aren't popular here. My best overseas set up with AT&T was with my Zenfone 2. I moved my AT&T SIM card to slot 2 for voice and text messaging, and put a local SIM card in slot one for data, voice and texting.
     
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  17. dmapr

    dmapr Silver Senior Member
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    @viewfly, it differs. I generally prefer to have a local SIM in hand when I arrive, but it isn't always feasible. In Denmark I couldn't find a reputable enough online source before the trip so I got it out of a vending machine while waiting at the luggage carousel :) With Croatia there was every indication that buying at a local post office will be much cheaper than ordering online, so that's what I did. In Japan & Israel I was able to order online at decent prices for my purposes at https://www.econnectjapan.com/products/sim/ and https://www.prepaidisraelisim.com/, respectively. Plus in those two countries it's much harder to buy it locally or so I was led to believe. The Japan SIM was shipped to the airport, Israeli to home. The Russian SIM I try to maintain on a permanent basis.

    I found http://prepaid-data-sim-card.wikia.com/wiki/Prepaid_SIM_with_data to be quite helpful in my research, and what it said about Norway was what prompted me to add the $10/day plan :)
     
  18. viewfly

    viewfly Mobile RF Advisor
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    @dmapr, thanks for the help. I also, many, many years ago rented a SIM in Japan ( and local phone). It was somewhat easy, however like you I had to prepare the transaction before departure, and then pick it up at the airport, after luggage. My travel mates were not too happy, for the extra delay I incurred, although it was reasonably fast.

    I need a working phone at the airport upon arrival, so another country where I've got to seek out a local post office...where there is just no time. Need that phone upon landing to coordinate pick up, etc.

    I glanced at the links. Looking at the Israel SIM options, it's clear money is saved for trips over the 7 days, only marginally for 2 and 7 day trips. $20 plus $17.50 for data on a 2 day trip. Plus MMS is not supported. 7 day is $48.50., so ~$50 vs $70.

    That I need to spend time with the passport ID recently required because of terrorism checks, and that they are prepaid, needing top off, are little things, but also an annoyance.

    As you say each country is different so maybe a short trip is cheaper than $10 a day, but that is planning ahead to think about.

    It's way too hassle free just to use the new ATT plans today. But I agree for a months vacation or work travel it's the way to go....or have a spare unlocked iPhone plus the US linked one. So a bit of a hassle is worth it.

    Did I view some thing wrong below?

    [​IMG]


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  19. dmapr

    dmapr Silver Senior Member
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    No, I don't think so. Israeli SIMs are definitely best for repeated long trips. I think they may be the only place that I've seen where you pay for the SIM itself ($20), which is a big drawback. For my second trip to Israel I just reused the existing SIM cards, saving that $20. My first trip was for nearly three weeks, so that was obviously a better deal. Also the actual list of "plans" you can tie to the SIM keeps changing, so when I first bought it there was a 3GB 30 day plan that was no longer offered when I went the second time, so the refill plan that would suit the length of my stay cost only $10 less than what I paid the first time, instead of the $20.

    Also, both in Israel and in Moscow I make use of the Uber/Gett. In both places there were occasions where the driver would have a difficulty locating us due to the urban configuration and had to make a call. I don't think they would've made a call to the US number, but having a local number makes it easy.
     
  20. viewfly

    viewfly Mobile RF Advisor
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    Yeah, the Uber thing makes sense...and fortunately you speak the native language. In Japan, and most countries, A taxi call to me would be useless.

    Plans do change all the time. After a long trip like 12 hours on a plane, I like to text home and get work on phone calls for last minute travel changes.

    $10 is pretty much a drink in a bar equivalent theses days. I definitely will look at it more closely, but each time so far for a week trips, it seems a hassle, especially if I have to spend part of my time finding a kiosk. Many times when I worked, I might be in England and then asked to fly to Paris the next day...it's reassuring to have my working ATT SIM in all those countries.

    The other thing that I thought useful, and maybe not true today, that ATThad contracts with all the cellular providers say in UK. So my phone would pick the strongest signal, and I didn't have to figure out which carrier had the best coverage before my trip. Imagine what it would be like if our phones just use ATT, Verizon or T mobiles here based on that?

    I appreciate the update on SIMs. My understanding of the ATT plan is that I can keep the $10/day option on, and it only engages while I'm overseas? So if I'm kidnapped and shipped off to Croatia, I can use my phone from the trunk of the car, without preplanning? . JK


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    #20 viewfly, Aug 31, 2017
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2017
  21. dmapr

    dmapr Silver Senior Member
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    Yes, the $10/day is quite safe to have on at all times. It is only triggered by a chargeable event overseas, so even when abroad you don't start automatically paying unless you use data/make calls/send texts. Incoming texts do not trigger it.

    It is true that in Russia I have the language advantage and that in Japan we both would have been dead in the water, but in Israel every cab driver I rode with spoke English quite well. More and more people in Russia do too, I've witnessed some random cyclist on the street giving directions to a tourist couple in very passable English and my friends tell me that English is becoming a requirement for a lot of client-facing jobs such as ticket agents (even for the local subway system), cab drivers and such.
     
  22. viewfly

    viewfly Mobile RF Advisor
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    I could barely understand the taxi drivers in Scotland. And many times even New York taxi drivers


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