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How to use DLNA on your phone?

Discussion in 'GENERAL Wireless Discussion' started by RadioRaiders, May 23, 2012.

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  1. RadioRaiders

    RadioRaiders RF Black-Belt
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    I bought a new TV that has a "DLNA" certification sticker on the box. Looking thru my Android 2.2.2 phone, I also see I have a DLNA icon in my menu/settings. How do I get my TV and phone to interact, eg. to view pictures from my phone on my TV, or stream videos between devices? Has anyone here done that? It seems DLNA supports a "client/server" relationship between the (eg.) TV and phone, but which is the client and which is the server?

    I read a couple of links, but it's still not clear to me how to make it work.

    DLNA: what it is and what you need to know | News | TechRadar

    Digital Living Network Alliance - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     
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  2. dmapr

    dmapr Silver Senior Member
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    It is most likely that neither phone nor TV can act as a DLNA server, only as a DLNA client. DLNA servers are usually built into storage components, such as NAS, although many PCs can act as one, too.

    That being said, if you have DLNA server device that has videos on it, the DLNA client will usually have some UI that will allow you to browse and choose a video on the server to stream.
     
  3. dmapr

    dmapr Silver Senior Member
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  4. Yankees368

    Yankees368 Compulsive Signal Checker
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    Ugh, DLNA is the biggest "who cares" feature they can throw on a box. It never works properly. Even when it does, the UI is usually so poor that you don't want to use it.
    (see: Samsung AllShare)
     
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  5. RadioRaiders

    RadioRaiders RF Black-Belt
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    Ah, Ok, I figured it out. Pretty cool. If there's no DLNA server available, then DLNA doesn't do anything, as it's not a peer-to-peer thing, but a server-client thing.

    I have NAS in my home network that is actually a DLNA server. Once I enable the DLNA on my phone or TV, then it finds the NAS and I can browse the directories and stream media, view pictures, etc. With my TV, I had to change the setting in the "media" section from "Flat" to "Folder" (whatever that meant), then I could use it. On my phone, I could see the NAS immediately when I selected "Play Media". Altho I mostly have Divx movies on my NAS and my phone isn't able to play them :( (I guess I need to check if some codec pack with Divx is available...?) I can also copy media to/from the NAS which is nice :)

    When I select "Share Media" on my phone, I can see my Motorola phone from my Windows PC in the "Network" section, but some driver installation failed (?) and I can't view anything on my phone from my PC.
     
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  6. dmapr

    dmapr Silver Senior Member
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    "Flat" vs. "Folder" means that it will attempt to find all media regardless of the location and present you with the list. Naturally, with a large number of media files it can get overwhelmed or just be slow.

    "Folder" should list only the media files in the folder you're looking at, and the subfolders and allow you to browse from folder to folder. Harder to find stuff if you don't know where it is, but with proper hierarchy not as taxing with a large number of files.
     
  7. RadioRaiders

    RadioRaiders RF Black-Belt
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    With my TV media setting on "Flat" (default setting) only USB sticks physically stuck in the TV were found despite having an ethernet cable connected to it. I was wondering why I couldn't see my NAS and was getting p*ssed-off, when out of desperation I looked at the TV's user guide (when all else fails, read the directions :p) and read that for DLNA to be enabled the TV's media setting must be on "Folder", and when I switched to that, voilà, I could suddenly see my NAS and stream from it.

    ...are these "Flat/Folder" settings some kind of standardized terms? If yes, what standard? (ie: DLNA terms, IEEE terms, etc.?) Is "Flat/Folder" settings found on all DLNA enabled TV's?

    There's no app needed, as it's built in to Android. When you click that "Share Media" button, your phone is a DLNA server and can be detected by other DLNA clients on the same network (if you are using WiFi, I guess on a cellular connection it won't work). So since DLNA enabled phones can act as both a client and server, you can actually have kind of a peer-to-peer communication between phones.

    When I enabled the "Share Media" on my phone, on my TV I could see it as a server, and view pictures stored on my phone on my TV (and I guess could stream mp3s, videos, etc. as well)

    [​IMG]


    This is the first time I experimented with it, and it worked pretty good for me. I don't know, maybe in the past it wasn't used much or developed, or implemented in a bad way, but as more and more things are becoming IP enabled there needs to be a way to transfer media between them. DLNA looks like a great way to stream videos, share pictures, etc. between PC/TV/phone while you are on your home network :thumb:. And since it's standardized, there shouldn't be any incompatibility issues between manufacturers, excluding Apple, because (as usual) they have their own proprietary way of doing this (maybe a FireWire cable is involved? :p) . Altho it's mentioned there is a DLNA app for Apple, so I guess it's still possible with a work-around.

     
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  8. viewfly

    viewfly Mobile RF Advisor
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    [​IMG]
    [​IMG][


    Sent from my iPhone 4S using Tapatalk
     
  9. RadioRaiders

    RadioRaiders RF Black-Belt
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    ^^ Just to clarify, that's a 3rd party app (media:connect), and DLNA is not supported natively in any Apple product, correct?

    Also, do you know the reason why Apple isn't supporting DLNA directly in their products (requiring use a 3rd party app), or why they aren't one of the 200+ DLNA member companies?
     
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  10. viewfly

    viewfly Mobile RF Advisor
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    'I dunno' Because they are the world most profitable innovative company?

    Do you know why android doesn't have a decent native music player?

    What's wrong with apps?


    Sent from my iPhone 4S using Tapatalk
     
  11. dmapr

    dmapr Silver Senior Member
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    No idea of what the terminology is and whether there is any "official" one.
    Where would I find this DLNA stuff? I don't think I came across it anywhere on my phone.
     
  12. charlyee

    charlyee Ultimate Insanity
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    Not sure if there is DLNA on your GN, but my Atrix had it and worked well. I thought I saw it on the Vivid as well, but I may be wrong.

    Maybe check out the Vivid?
     
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  13. RadioRaiders

    RadioRaiders RF Black-Belt
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    That sounds like kind of a childish reason for not joining any alliance or standard group. Why should people with Apple products be "punished" by not having common features/standards on their products? Because Apple tries to push their own standards that nobody else but them adopts?

    Not sure what that has to do with the discussion above. Actually I've been using Android music player for years and have no problem with it. Since you have never owned an Android device to my knowledge, I'm a little leery of the basis of your opinion.

    Generally, nothing. However native OS features are usually preferred to 3rd party apps, as they are tested and integrated directly into the OS, so maybe more efficient and reliable.

    My Android version doesn't have a native data counter built in (newer versions do), so I use a 3rd party app for that. No problem.

    On my Motorola with OS 2.2.2, the DLNA is right there in the main menu, a big green "DLNA" icon right between "Dialer" and "e-mail" icons. Maybe it's built in to only Motorola Android software and not your HTC? :headscrat
     
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  14. dmapr

    dmapr Silver Senior Member
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    I suppose I could look but I don't feel like dragging it home :) As RR indicates it may be built-in to Motorolas only. At least from my looking around it seemed like everybody else needed an app. And anyway, for me it's just a very mild curiosity as I'm not even sure what I have at home that can stream DLNA :)

    I don't have an HTC, but it could be missing from my Samsung just as well :) I most definitely don't have any green icons and I'm not sure I have an email icon either. Dialer icon is most definitely blue :D
     
  15. viewfly

    viewfly Mobile RF Advisor
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    I don't know the reasons and neither do you. No one seems punished. The app is there and the standards are clearly supported on iPhone.

    It just seems to work. Where is the problem? Or was the problem that you are annoyed that there is no problem using this standard so easily in iOS?
     
  16. RadioRaiders

    RadioRaiders RF Black-Belt
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    I understand clearly there is an app for the iPhone that does DLNA. From the screenshot you gave, it has 3-of-5 stars, so maybe doesn't do it so well, but whatever ;) Maybe there's a better app. But my larger question was why Apple doesn't "play well with others" when it comes to technology standards. It always seems to be "Apple vs. Everyone else". Latest case in point, nano-SIM card:
    RIM, Motorola try compromise in Apple nano-SIM battle | Mobile - CNET News

    Of course, as I pointed out in the post prior to your screenshot, and you again pointed out again (and again) that apps exist for that. However, since Apple is "against" DLNA, they don't make their products "DLNA-friendly", meaning you have to find a work around (ie: 3rd party app). If you have other Apple products (eg. Mac, NAS drive, etc.) you can I guess get DLNA to work via some "apps" or something, but you don't get that "plug and play" experience out of the box, making it more hard for Apple-products to easily work with DLNA.

    Personally, I don't have any Apple products so it's a non-issue for me. If you are happy using apps and work-arounds, or just don't use DLNA and use Apples version of it instead, then it's a non-issue for you as well. I was speaking on a more broad and general scale. Why won't Apple support DLNA "out of the box" or natively?
     
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  17. viewfly

    viewfly Mobile RF Advisor
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    I don't know why Apple is not in that consortium and you do not either.

    But you take the 'evil empire' attitude; the glass half empty view point.

    It is really funny to read.
     
  18. RadioRaiders

    RadioRaiders RF Black-Belt
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    I'm looking at facts and forming an opinion. Apple seems to like to stay inside their sealed world and "not play well with others". While they are a successful company, I don't think that being successful and closing your company off from others are mutually exclusive. I'm pretty sure if Apple suddenly introduced native support for DLNA they wouldn't suffer any sales losses, on the contrary, they might gain a few new customers. Glad reading my posts bring a smile to your face :)

    Here's a list of all DLNA member companies. Apple noticeably absent:
    http://www.dlna.org/dlna-for-industry/about-dlna/member-companies

    As for native support for DLNA in Android, I just checked my SE phone, and there's no DLNA icon in there, so I'm suspecting more it's a Motorola implementation than a stock Android one. I'm not sure why it isn't stock, is there a royalty fee for using it or something? eg. like standard Linux only includes "free" non-proprietary drivers or whatever
     
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  19. viewfly

    viewfly Mobile RF Advisor
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    Doesn't seem like there are any 'penalties' for not being part of the Alliance (DLNA).

    I became intrigued with this a bit. I don't think there is any fees, not even a 'standard' to DLNA, more of a 'recommended guidelines' to members. Also, there seem to be plenty of Apps on the Android store and Apple Store for devices that don't support DLNA directly or just Apps to give a prettier GUI to the native DLNA (the way that there are many android/iOS alternative browsers, email apps, etc to the native software).

    Likewise there are Android apps, like DoubleTwist, for Android (and PC's) to synch to iTunes and stream media via Airplay to an Apple TV connected to your HDMI TV (no DLNA TV required).

    Interesting history. Apple introduced its Digital Audio Access Protocol in April 2003 with iTunes 4.0, to stream iTunes music (pc or mac ) to things like its Airport Express WiFI that has an audio jack for local speakers, and network printers. Sony started the Digital Home Networking Group in June 2003, changing the name to DLNA 12 months later (from wiki). Seems like it started as an Apple vs Sony thing.

    Given the nature of SmartPhones today, and the Application Store model, it seem no one is restricted from streaming media from any smartphone platform to another platform. It seems DLNA or Apple's version are simple software protocols that can be easily installed with Apps in both platforms (Android, iOS).

    I installed the MediaConnect App on my iPhone and I can see all my iOS media in folders for streaming to my DLNA TV. Of course in iOS, the 'Airplay' icon is imbedded in the YouTube player, the music and photo player, and system wide for sharing the iPhone screen to my Apple TV connected TV. That is nice. Maybe the native DLNA does something similar (instead of a stand alone native app). MediaConnect make a similar Android App.

    I guess even with a standard, there are problems with having 200+ groups agreeing. As Yankee stated above, the forums are full of problems...but I think it is getting better. Found this on the web.
    What is DLNA? - TV & DVD - Which? Technology



    'Does DLNA work?
    The DLNA philosophy is admirable. If all devices communicated wirelessly and shared content seamlessly it would be wonderful, but there are some limitations.

    Firstly, file formats can be a bit of an issue. Some DLNA devices might play MP4 video files but the device it's being sent to may be unable to recognise this particular file type. The same goes for the popular DivX video file type that many LG TVs support.


    Digital Rights Management (DRM) is another stumbling block on many people’s way to wireless home entertainment. DRM controls the way that people can share digital media in order to protect copyright. Some devices, despite being DLNA-certified, won't share certain music or video files with other devices due to DRM restrictions in place.

    Furthermore, while around 250 manufacturers are part of the DLNA, many offer their own take on DLNA and some major players, don't support DLNA at all.

    Apple AirPlay and Samsung All Share Play
    Both Apple and Samsung provide their own takes on DLNA, branding them Apple AirPlay and Samsung All Share Play respectively.


    These systems are a guarantee, of sorts, that the various devices connected to the network are compatible. For example, A Samsung Galaxy Tab tablet can easily be wirelessly connected to a Samsung TV if on the same network. Likewise, it doesn't require much effort to play content from an iPad to another up-to-date Apple product.

    Summary
    DLNA is a joy to use when it works. In a perfect world you simply connect all your devices to your wi-fi network and share content between them. In reality, however, there are often a number of hurdles to overcome, and while a mass of cables is usually unsightly and confusing, in some circumstances they might still the best option.'


    Personally, the Apple version via the original Express and now Apple TV were trivial to connect and work. When I get to my other home where I have a Samsung DLNA TV, I'm curious to see how that works with iOS. I don't have an Apple TV for that unit, so this can prove very useful.

    I think my daughter's fiancé purchased a hard drive that had DLNA installed with Hulu for wifi streaming of movies and such from his PC to that device and to a connected TV (via standard video cables). I never paid much attention to it though.
     
  20. RadioRaiders

    RadioRaiders RF Black-Belt
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    Normally with open standards anyone can use it, even if you aren't a member. The main reason companies join these kind of "alliances" is to give input, share ideas and generally drive the direction of the standard. If there was a royalty fee, like I believe HDMI has, then everyone would need to pay, member or not.


    You can usually find ways around, just like your laptop adapter is 120-220V, and you just need to change the plug when visiting a 220V country. But if the whole world had decided on the same voltage and plug, life would be that much simpler. That's kind of why companies join alliances like DLNA, so companies ensure they make equipment compatible with the other manufacturers, without customers needing to find work-arounds. If each company made their own proprietary version, it would become a mess for consumers.



    I'm confused by this statement. (Samsung is a DLNA member company and Apple is not.) So, Samsung's "All Share Play" is just their "brand" name for being DLNA compliant? I have a Samsung DVD/media player with LAN connection, and it can detect all DLNA servers on my home network and stream media from them directly (ie: without me putting any work-around in place), so to me it looks like Samsung's "All Play" is straight-up DLNA.

    As for Apple's AirPlay, I don't think that's directly compatible with DLNA devices, as it's another standard all-together, is that correct? :confused: Or is AirPlay DLNA complaint? ex. if you have an AirPlay server, can I open a DLNA client on my phone and stream from it?



    I don't understand the comment above by the author of the article. If a TV can't play a certain format, it's not the fault of DLNA, it's the fault of the TV. Or maybe it's again a problem of having too many (video) formats available. If every device used the same video codec, there wouldn't be any incompatibility problems.


    Here the author does have a good point. My Samsung DVD/media player can record cable TV shows, but it says in the User Guide that these recorded videos are DRM protected, and can only be played back on the device that recorded it. Since my Samsung DVD/media player is only a DLNA client (not a server) I can't stream media stored on it to other devices anyway (I can stream towards the Samsung, as it is a DLNA client, I just can't stream away from it because it's not a server), so I'm kind of disappointed by these restrictions (DRM protetion, and no DLNA server built-in). On the other hand, my Linux-based satellite TV tuner does not use DRM on it's recorded media, and it is also a DLNA server, so I can turn my satellite TV tuner and stream any recorded TV show to any DLNA enabled client on my home network. Which is very cool and features I will look for when buying media devices ( like TV's, cable/SAT tuners, etc.)
     
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    #20 RadioRaiders, May 27, 2012
    Last edited: May 27, 2012
  21. viewfly

    viewfly Mobile RF Advisor
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    I was unaware of this, but number of home audio systems have incorporated AirPlay, including Harman, Denon, Marantz, iHome, Philips, Klipsch, Pioneer, and Bowers and Wilkens.

    Harman launches JBL wireless AirPlay speaker | The Digital Home - CNET News

    It seems like the DNLA was forming a group as a kind of 'catch up' to Apple's already release product in 2003. According to sources, in 2011 there are 26 'promotor' members, and 199 'contributiong members.

    But it seems like today pretty much anyone can incorporate Airplay into hardware today. The whole thing seems like a non issue today. To me it seems very open sourced to connect...but the 'server' is iTunes or what is on your iOS devices (iPhone, iPad, mac or PC).

    What makes the Smartphones of today, 'smart' is the software and the Applications Store, which means the OS provider doesn't have to make all the software for the device.

    Some actually prefer the email clients and browsers from the App Stores (Android and iOS) better than the native stuff.
     
  22. RadioRaiders

    RadioRaiders RF Black-Belt
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    I'm not sure who came out with what first, but AirTunes was audio only, and only in the last 1-2 years was re-namded "AirPlay" to include video, altho I don't think any mfgrs other than Apple has used it (for video):

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-...g-airplay-for-streaming-video-on-devices.html

    With the exception of the few audio products listed above (and of course Apple products) I'm not really aware of any other AirPlay devices. At least I haven't seen any "AirPlay" certified stickers on anything in the stores.

    DLNA on the other hand is present in alot of consumer products today, and not just phones. Without even knowing it, I bought a NAS hard-drive, SAT-TV tuner, TV, phone and cable-TV-box that all had DLNA built into it and can communicate with each other.

    Oh, and yea, it looks like Samsung's "All Play" is DLNA certified, so it works out of the box with other DLNA devices, but maybe they added some proprietary elements and call it "All Play":
    Guide to DLNA and Samsung AllShare
     
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  23. RadioRaiders

    RadioRaiders RF Black-Belt
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    I agree for the phone it's not too big of a deal because people make apps that can make DLNA/AirPlay work on it. But the compatibility problem can still exist in other devices. For ex. if you have an AirPlay NAS server in your network, but your Samsung TV is only DLNA compatible, then you won't be able to stream from your AirPlay server.

    This is kind of why it's good for all mfgs to agree on one standard.

    DLNA does have a standard apparently, and if a device is "DLNA Certified" then it should be compliant with other DLNA Certified devices. Just like all wifi (802.11) standard compliant devices can communicate between each other, even if made by different mfgs.


    [​IMG]
    https://members.dlna.org/digital_living/product_types/
     
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  24. viewfly

    viewfly Mobile RF Advisor
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    All of this is soooo much easier and user friendly then even 5 years ago, IMHO.

    I'm quite happy with the smooth, well planned and engineered Apple TV system for my non internet HDTV set. And if I wish to use my more expensive wifi DLNA $2000 Samsung TV set alone, it seems that I can do that easily with a bit of free, simple DLNA software in an App Store to get on board with any standard. I'll find out how 'easy' DLNA is some time later when I'm home. With 300+ Million iOS users out there, that is quite a market.

    I agree with you that standards are good. But before DLNA wifi TVs started making their debut, the $99 Apple TV box made any plain HDMI input TV useful. The only Apple device my brother has is an Apple TV for playing iTunes movies....he thinks it is really simple and great. He doesn't need a PC or any device to use it.

    Let's just be happy that all this is pretty seamless today, and probably even more seamless in the future.

    It all seems of little consequence to me; there seems to be little motivation for Apple to change their standards to DLNA...especially if the 'DLNA certified' requirement is to pre test the hardware and software by the DLNA committee, made up of competitors like Samsung, Sony, Nokia, etc. LOL ;) Apple likes their secrets, kept secret.

    Maybe that is why not all Android mgfr's make native DLNA products....;)
     
  25. RadioRaiders

    RadioRaiders RF Black-Belt
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    I also have been using an external media-streamer connected to the HDMI port of my TV the last few years, but when I saw I could buy a TV set with a media streamer built-in, I thought that was a great feature, as I have one less box connected to my TV. I think alot of consumers will appreciate that also: why buy an external media-streaming box for ~$100 and connect it to the HDMI port of your new TV if you can have it built right into the TV? Unfortunately for Apple, they are not having any TV mfgrs include their AirPlay standard in them (maybe they like to keep AirPlay secret from them? :p), so you still need an external box to have your TV be AirPlay friendly.

    Here's some reviews of external media-streamers. The review of Apple TV mentions it's good if you have alot of other Apple products to connect to it:
    Best streaming-media boxes - CNET Reviews

    Based on this, it sounds like Apple is steering away from DLNA and pushing AirPlay so they can make money selling content via iTunes, which could be a good business model for them, as they have succeeded so far controlling iTunes and App store with the iDevice market. However, if they don't work together with TV mfgrs (like Samsung, Toshiba, etc.) to get their AirPlay standard built in to TV's, then they will struggle in that market because consumers will probably prefer to go with the common standard of DLNA that's already built into their TV's, phone, NAS-servers, etc. And as Apple charges (I believe) a $4 royalty fee for AirPlay use, and DLNA is free and supported by every other mfgr, I don't see much incentive for TV mfgrs to include any AirPlay support on their TV's.

    PS- If you go to GSM Arena and search for "DLNA" it shows 287 phones, so I don't think anyone is "afraid" to get their phone DLNA Certified ;)
    http://www.gsmarena.com/results.php...0&sColor=&StandBy=0&TalkTime=0&sFreeText=dlna
     
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  26. viewfly

    viewfly Mobile RF Advisor
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    TV's are a marginal profit making market for Sony, Samsung, etc.

    Those guys biggest worry today, according to analysts, is the possibility of Apple introducing their own real TV later this year, and being as successful as their other iDevices have been. NONE of these guys cares how successful they are as a group of mgfr's...They just individually wish to be as $$ successful as Apple is. ;)

    I don't think they care about standards...They were just hoping that by banding together they could beat the profitability of Apple current products.

    Maybe it is time to move into the corner for a 'Time Out', RR. Glad that you are so interested in the market welfare of Apple!
     
  27. dmapr

    dmapr Silver Senior Member
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    I have to say, I've always found plain HDMI input TVs useful — before and after the DLNA or $99 AppleTV box became available :p
     
  28. viewfly

    viewfly Mobile RF Advisor
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    I
    :confused: Now your example left me confused. 287 phones are DLNA certified. So what? An App gives me DLNA for iOS on my iPhone and iPad :)

    Also your link to the 'Best external media Streamer Boxes', is curious. None of them support DLNA or not very well, according to the links reviews. I thought it was a 'standard' :confused: :p

    You forgot to mention that. So I have to buy this box and another to get DLNA?

    ROKU 2XS

    The bad: The best streaming channels require paid subscriptions or pay-per-view fees. The Roku 2 XS doesn't currently support DLNA access (streaming media from networked PCs), and USB file support is very limited. Don't expect a full-blown Wii-like gaming experience; Angry Birds is currently the only game available.


    WD TV LIVE

    The bad: The best streaming channels require paid subscriptions or pay-per-view fees. There's no support for Amazon Instant. The remote buttons are rubbery, and the onscreen keyboard is a pain to use. DLNA support is spotty, and the software still has a few bugs to iron out.


    So the main topic of this thread is about sharing media on your mobile device with your TV...and only the Apple TV external box does that. Apple TV also gives you iTunes movies, NetFlix, YouTube, Vimeo, MLB, NBA, NHL. Plus you can stream most things like Pandora from your PC or MAC.

    Not saying that those boxes are bad or inferior...but Apple offers the DLNA equivalent for their customers that these boxes don't ....So those 287 DLNA certified mobile phones you mentioned, are out of luck with the above boxes?. :rolleyes:

    I know Apple has debated internally about providing free AirPlay to TV's...but in any case a $4 fee per set is trivial out of the $2000 I just spent on my Samsung TV with DLNA...which has YouTube, Netflix, Hulu etc...but with a pretty clumsy GUI I have to say.

    From your link:

    Apple TV:

    The good: The Apple TV lets you stream all of the movies and TV shows available in the iTunes Store to your HDTV on a rental or purchase basis, with purchases stored in the cloud. Purchased content can also be transferred to other iOS devices for offline viewing. Netflix, MLB.TV, and a handful of other online media services are available, plus music, videos, and photos can be streamed from iOS devices using AirPlay. And Apple TV's user interface remains best-in-class.


    Seems like the Apple TV is the best device for my solution. No doubt, since it is only software, the AirPlay system will make its way into other TV's (300 Million reasons why an Apple user would buy a Samsung over an Apple real TV) in the future.

    But I'm pretty happy with my current components. Have the Apple TV external box, and my new TV's will have DLNA that I can access with a free App.
     
  29. RadioRaiders

    RadioRaiders RF Black-Belt
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    If you think DLNA is the result of the entire tech industry ganging up on Apple because they are jealous of their profit margins, then yes indeed, it's time for a "time-out" :rolleyes:

    Yea, actually, I think I confused things with that link. Those boxes are "external" media streamers, meaning they are geared for downloading paid content from the internet. DLNA is built for sharing media within your home network. So, yea, my mistake, I gave a wrong link. It's comparing apples and oranges.

    As for the "bugs" surrounding DLNA, what exactly are they? :confused: My experience has been only good. Everything "just works". The only incident I experience that something "doesn't work" is when a codec is not supported, for example my phone records video to a format (ie: codec) that my TV doesn't support. But that's not really a failure of DLNA but more a codec mismatch. Maybe DLNA could give a specific codec requirement in the future to align all devices?

    Hmm, I don't know about that. Do you have any info backing up that Apple is in talks with TV mfgrs to include AirPlay software on their ethernet enabled TV's? If DLNA is the industry standard, I'm not sure why TV mfgrs would want to bother paying Apple a royalty fee and going thru the hassle of installing integrating another software on their TV's. Yes Apple has 300 million iDevices out there, but as we pointed out before, it's not a problem to install a DLNA app on most them ;) (For the 287 DLNA enabled phones on GSMarena, you mentioned that "Maybe that is why not all Android mgfr's make native DLNA products", I was pointing out that alot do)

    Oh, on a side note, nothing to do with DLNA really, but HDMI requires a $10k annual fee and $0.15 per device royalty fee:
    HDMI :: Manufacturer :: Becoming an Adopter :: Terms
    I think DLNA is free, but if anyone has info to the contrary, please let me know.
     
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  30. viewfly

    viewfly Mobile RF Advisor
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    Good catch dmapr :) Yeah, HDMI is very useful, required for HD today from cable boxes and Blu ray. It is nice to have one cable do HD quality video and audio too. Although the cables are way overpriced.
     
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