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How do signals travel between towers and phones?

Discussion in 'GENERAL Wireless Discussion' started by Gary L, Jan 25, 2013.

  1. Gary L

    Gary L New Member

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    I always wanted to know if the towers have to be able to almost see each other to communicate? If there are mountains in between must there be another tower to act as a repeater?

    I will soon have a new tower about 3 miles as the crow flies from my home but it will have a mountain in between. Not sure if I will get any signal from it and don't have any signal now, absolutely zero bars and Searching for service is all I get.

    So, the question is, do the towers have to be close to line of sight or can the signals travel over and up and down ground obstructions?

    Even the best phones on the market such as IPhone 5 and other smart phones are dumb as a box of rocks at my place.
     
  2. Maximum Signal

    Maximum Signal Senior Member
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    No phone , antenna or even amplifier can overcome a line of sight issue . If there is a mountain between you and the new tower . You will not realize any benefits from it. Only way would to be spend a lot of money and put an antenna above the top of your hil so it has line of sight to the tower and connect that amplifier to a wireless amplifier system in your building
     
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  3. RadioRaiders

    RadioRaiders RF Black-Belt
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    Maximum Signal is right, signals can't go thru extremely thick barriers like mountains. However, signals do "bounce" (reflect) and if other mountains are around, you may have a chance at picking up a reflecting signal from the new tower (altho will probably be weak and suffer from interference). Lower frequencies (700 or 800MHz) tend to "bounce" better than high frequencies (1900 or 2500MHz), so if the new tower is using 700 or 800 MHz the chances improve more that you'll get a signal.
     
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  4. KevinJames

    KevinJames WA's 1st retired mod
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    Line of sight has always been a concern with any radio signal, as cited. One technology that some wireless carriers are considering implementing is a satellite assist to their land-based technology. However it also is not impervious to the line-of-sight issue. As I understand the current focus, the phones themselves would not be satellite phones (which already exist) but instead the satellites would communicate directly with the towers already in place. Admittedly, I am not very well read on this. Just bits and pieces I've seen.
     

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