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Help with IP conflict when using Alltel wireless

Discussion in 'Alltel Forum' started by psteege, Jul 2, 2008.

  1. psteege

    psteege New Member

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    My system consists of 5 PC's and a Dish Network satellite box.
    I have a D-link router and use the four ports for three of the PC's and wirelss to a laptop and one PC.
    The satellite box has a direct wire and uses DHCP to connect.

    When I installed the Alltel USB wireless on my PC and selected Internet connection sharing, it make my other network card use 192.168.0.1 as its IP.
    That conflicted with my wireless router so I changed him to 192.168.0.2. Now when he makes a DHCP connection he sends a 192.168.0.2 gateway address to the connecting wireless machines and the Sat box.
    That caused a problem with the laptop and one wireless PC and the Satellite box.
    I was able to force default gateways for 192.168.0.2 and 192.168.0.1 into the PC's, but cannot change it in the Sat box.

    I know this is a long intro into my question, but I thought some background info would speed up the answers.

    My question is how can I resolve having the PC with the Alltel card and the router from NOT having the same 192.168.0.1 IP?

    Thanks for any help.

    psteege
     
  2. COtech

    COtech Bronze Senior Member
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    At the simple level of home/office networking, it seems to expected that one would only have one route to the rest of the Internet. Now you have two gateways to the rest of the world.

    You're making a start by have them at different addresses. What would be even better would be to have only one gateway turned on (or connected) at a time. This would eliminate confusion on your LAN.

    I am not a networking professional, just the family's IT guy (unpaid).

    COtech
     
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  3. psteege

    psteege New Member

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    Just to make sure everyone understands my network path, it looks like this:

    WEB <--- Alltel USB <--- 192.168.0.1 <------ D-Link Router (X.X.0.2) <--- X.X.0.100
    <---- X.X.0.102
    <---- X.X.0.103
    <---- X.X.0.104
    (wireless) ,--- laptop X.X.0.105
    (wireless) ,--- satellite X.X.0.106

    The Alltel and X.X.0.1 are inside the same PC. ICS forced it to X.X.0.1
    The router's WAN port is not being used.
    All PC's on the 4 router ports are static IP's
    Wireless connections are DHCP
    Like I said, the router sends out X.X.0.2 at the default gateway whenever a device get a DHCP or wireless connection and that address as a default gw will not allow a path to the WEB.
     
  4. COtech

    COtech Bronze Senior Member
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    Oh, I missunderstood "satellite box" as HughesNet or WildBlue, a connection to a satellite delivered ISP.

    What I think needs to be done:

    Your ICS pc could be the DHCP single source (turn off in the router), but that might not work right.

    Your router should be just a router, not the gateway. Your ICS pc has IP address 192.168.0.1, at the other end of the Ethernet cable connect to the D-Link's WAN RJ-45(the ICS pc is your ISP), and in the router assign IP address 192.168.0.2 to the WAN port..

    You need to create a Static Route between those two addresses, (one of your D-Link's screens), and label the 192.168.0.1 as the Gateway (to the rest of the world).

    Now we need subnetting. We turn on DHCP here in the D-Link (and off in the ICS pc), and let it assign 192.168.1.1 through 192.168.1.254 (or less). You assign your wired PCs static IP addresses in this 192.168.1.n range, and have DCHP hand out addresses to the WiFi connections.

    I think this is how it should work. Please mention your D-Link router's model number, so I can read it and use their setup screen names if this doesn't point you in the proper direction.

    Are you the same fellow I advised to study Internet Connection Sharing? You've done well, and no doubt have some confidence built up now.

    COtech
     
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  5. psteege

    psteege New Member

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    I am a bit confused.
    The XP Pro box that is doing the ICS has two NIC's.
    1. One Alltel USB modem that is my primary connection to the Web.
    2. Inter PRO/100 that is connected to the router.

    The only DHCP server I have running is in the router.

    Are you saying I should start a DHCP service on the XP Pro box and then turn it off in the router.
    I can see where that should solve my problem, but I will have to learn how to setup DHCP in my XP Pro PC.

    Thanks, I will give that a try.
     
  6. COtech

    COtech Bronze Senior Member
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    No, don't turn on DHCP in the ICS pc--I was thinking aloud. I've never done this, only read of it.

    ICS pc(Intel PRO/100 on 192.168.0.1)<-> (192.168.0.2 on WAN port)D-Link
    You need to assign that router WAN port address as 192.168.0.2, and enter the static route between them, and have the Gateway address be 192.168.0.1.

    D-Link(LAN side is X.Y.Z.1) feeding the four-port switch and the WiFi radio (five-port switch, one port stays inside)..
    Port 1 is X.Y.Z.2
    Port 2 is X.Y.Z.3
    Port 3 is X.Y.Z.4
    Port 4 is not connected, and gets no address.
    Have DHCP in the D-Link on, to hand out the remainder of your chosen LAN addresses to the WiFi users and LAN port 4.

    I noticed you wrote your LAN side addresses as X.X.0.100. It reminds me you very well might need a whole new network number on the LAN side, something different from the WAN side. I suspect that the D-Link is filling in 10.0 for X.X, this gives you a Class A internal address. You could assign anything from 10.0.0.1 to 10.254.254.254 for your LAN side addresses (likely as a range, starting address and ending address, or starting address and count).

    Class B internal addresses you may use can be from 172.16.0.1 to 172.31.254.254.

    The Class C internal addresses are the 192.168.0.1 to 192.168.254.254, of which we have assigned just two, 192.168.0.1 and 192.168.0.2. That's why I had hoped using the 192.168.1.1 through 192.168.1.254 on the D-Link LAN side would work. I can't test it,. but you can. If it doesn't work, go to the Class B or A group addresses for the LAN side.

    I was just reading the MS-XP help pages about ICS. By default, DCHP is started,. handing out addresses 192.168.0.2 through 192.168.0.254 to its neighbors downstream (keeping 192.168.0.1 for itself).

    Internet Connection Sharing settings
    When you run the Network Setup Wizard and enable Internet Connection Sharing, some protocols, services, interfaces, and routes are configured automatically. The following table describes these configured items.

    Configured item Action
    IP address 192.168.0.1 Configured with a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 on the LAN adapter that is connected to the home or small office network.
    Autodial feature Enabled.
    Static default IP route Created when the dial-up connection is established.
    Internet Connection Sharing service Started.
    DHCP allocator Enabled with the default range of 192.168.0.1 and a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0. Unique addresses in the range 192.168.0.2 to 192.168.0.254 are allocated to private network clients.
    DNS proxy Enabled.

    One thing we are trying to avoid is Double NAT (network address translation). NAT happens in each device that does DHCP. So we need to pass those LAN IP address requests upstream to the ICS pc. Please, what is your D-Link router's model number? I need to read its manual, to advise you of correct settings.

    We'll lick this yet.

    COtech
     
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  7. psteege

    psteege New Member

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    I looked at the Services running under Computer Management - ->Services and Applications -->Services and there is no DHCP service running except DHCP Client.
    I looked under the TCP/IP properties on both the USB Alltel wireless and the Intel Pro100 card and neither on of them is running DHCP.
    I turned off DHCP on my router and retried starting a wireless PC. It could not get a DHCP lease until I turned DHCP back on in the router. That tells me that DHCP is not running under ICS.

    I wrote X.X.0.100 to ease not having to type the whole thing out. My LAN addresses are in the 192.168.0.X range. My DHCP service in my router is assigning address range 192.168.0.100 to 102.168.0.199 (default setting). My router is on 192.168.0.2, the four LAN ports are 192.168.0.1 (ICS assigned), 192.168.0.101 (static IP), 192.168.0.102 (static IP), 192.168.0.120 (DHCP assigned - satellite DishNetwork receiver). My two wireless boxes are assigned static DHCP addresses 192.158.0.103 and 192.168.0.105).

    I tried connecting the Intel Pro card to the WAN port on the router and did the above DHCP test and it also got NO dhcp lease until I turned DHCP back on in the router. I do
     
  8. psteege

    psteege New Member

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    [SOLVED] Re: Help with IP conflict when using Alltel wireless

    I wanted to post the answer to my problem and thank everyone who gave me tips and ideas that led to the solution. I apologize for my skepticism of ICS doing DHCP, but I could not see the service running and so I assumed, you all know how assuming works...LOL

    The problem was fixed this way:
    1. Connected USB modem to internet and re-ran the ICS network wizard which assigned 192.168.0.1 to my second NIC.
    2.. Connected crossover cable from XP PC to wireless router WAN port and did DHCP release and renew on the WAN port which gave the WAN port a IP in the 192.168.0.X range.
    3. Turned off the DHCP server in my wireless router.
    4. Removed the WAN port cable and connected a normal cable from the XP PC to port 1 on the wireless router.
    5. Restarted all my PC's, using DHCP auto, and they all got an IP from ICS in the 192.168.0.X range. Also all the wireless connections to the router got the same IP range,plus they were given 192.168.0.1 and the gateway address. This worked on my Dish network tv receiver and now it can see the Internet and connect so I can now order PPV movies again.....SUCCESS !!!

    Regards to all,
    psteege
     
  9. COtech

    COtech Bronze Senior Member
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    Okay, I see why it works that way (and I admire your persistance). There are three devices inside the D-Link wireless router box:
    a wireless access point
    a six port switch (four RJ-45's, an internal wireless access point connection, and an internal router connection)
    a router (connects from WAN port to the six port switch)

    You don't need a router with DHCP running, that's the ICS pc's job, so leaving it unconnected is brilliant. Now you can add an Ethernet connected shared printer on the switch, or anything else, and it will be on your 192.168.0.x LAN.

    If you need more wired connections, you just need to add another switch. Small ones come with five or eight, medium size is sixteen and twentyfour, etc. Your addressing limit in the 192.168.0. x LAN is 254 devices (wired and wireless). It's not 256 (0-255), because the first address and last address are reserved.
    192.168.0.0 network address
    192.168.0.255 broadcast address (all devices listen, correct device responds with its personal address for direct communications).

    I'm glad you got it, I hadn't found time to read the D-Link WBR-1310 manual (I'm guessing that your router model).

    COtech
     
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  10. psteege

    psteege New Member

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    COtech

    Thanks for the reply. I only have an old DI-514. Four ports plus the WAN, but I understand what you are saying about adding more switches if needed.
    It has definitely been a learning experience and I appreciate your tips along the way.
    I don't plan to change it because I am a firm believer of the philosophy "If it works don't FXXX with it"..LOL..but I do have two more questions.
    1. If I decide to add another switch, do I just plug it into an existing port with a crossover or a straight cable ?
    2. When I first plugged in the crossover cable and gave the router a 192.168.0.X IP on the WAN port, I still could not see the internet through the WAN port. It wasn't until I moved the XP box to port 1 that the other machines on my network could see the 192.168.0.1 ICS gateway and surf the web. Why is that ?
     
  11. COtech

    COtech Bronze Senior Member
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    Yes, either cable is fine because of auto-MDI/auto-MDI-X crossover cable detection. Straight cables are all you usually require. The old rule was if you were connecting like devices together (PC to PC, hub to hub, switch to switch, router to router), you used a crossover cable.
    Something like the D-Link DES-1105 5-port switch is all that would be needed. Unplug a PC from the DI-514, plug in the DES-1105 to the DI-514, plug the PC into the DES-1105. Save that crossover cable, you'll want/need it someday!
    A router is a Layer-3 device. It probably needed those static routes I mentioned, entered to route data through it to get from the built-in switch (LAN ports and WiFi radio) to the WAN port. Coming into the Layer-2 switch was sufficient to get the desired connectivity.
    I don't know for certain, time for me to experiment.

    COtech
     
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  12. psteege

    psteege New Member

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    Cotech

    Well like I said, it has been a learning experience. Thanks again for the assistance.

    Bye
    psteege
     

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