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GSM vs TDMA

Discussion in 'Northeastern US Wireless Forum' started by Imelda, Aug 18, 2002.

  1. Imelda

    Imelda New Member

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    Hello Everyone,

    I'm new to this forum and would like to know your opinions. I understand that GSM is the future, but in the Philadelphia area, GSM is just not up and running like it should be (only VoiceStream currently, and I heard Cingular someday?). I want to buy the Motorola V60 phone--do I go for the tried and true TDMA, or do I tough it out with spotty GSM? I guess what I'm trying to find out is how long will it be before GSM becomes the "it" network? Are we talking weeks, months, or years? Any thoughts?

    Thanks in advance for your replies,
    Linda
     
  2. RBOCMAN

    RBOCMAN Junior Member
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    GSM is already the "it" technology in the south, mainly because the network here is robust and has been scaled up and tried and tested. GSM is the way of the future, and to future true 3G technologies, all the handset manufacturers are on the bandwagon as well. Cingular and AT&T(No2 and No3) are also in efforts to go GSM/GPRS, which means in about a year or so you'll have rapid GSM expansion with all the operators in mutual cooperation in getting a digital footprint and spectrum rivaling that of Europe and Japan. Currently GSM is prevalent in all the metro areas and their suburbs and also along major highways.

    GSM is a progression of TDMA, and has more "throughput" per signal vs TDMA. TDMA is the incumbent technology built by the bells and will be around but wont be upgraded or supported once a frim GSM footprint is established. Weigh the two, and take into the account your short term vs long term interests. Stay away from the 2yr contracts especially on the TDMA networks of Cingular and AT&T.
     
  3. njsvrzncdma

    njsvrzncdma i cant stop the ringing..
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    hes right gsm is the "now thing" but the fact of the matter is that gsm just cant compare to tdma reception wise. at least not in my area. i live in central jersey and gsm just dosent hold up. however gsm is the way of the future and is a lot more capable then tdma. so in conclusion for now i say go tdma. and then in about a year or so make the switch to gsm when they get all the bugs worked out of it.
     
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  4. IdiOTeQnoLogY

    IdiOTeQnoLogY Bronze Senior Member
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    why dont you just go cdma and not have to worry about switching technologies down the road? cdma is already proven to be the best migration to 3g and between sprint and verizon they have the country covered one of those two carriers should do you good.
     
  5. netwire88

    netwire88 New Member

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    I had a similar question. I currently have Cingular TDMA. However, I've moved to NYC and Cingular has been tempting me to move to Cingular GSM. However, since I travel between NYC, North Jersey & South Jersey often, I wonder if it'll be a smart move. The good thing is that I get a new phone (Motorola V60) and 100 more minutes. However, I might have to get a new phone #, risk GSM technology, and lose my Nokia phone.
    Any suggestions would be appreciated.
    Thanks.
     
  6. dobby10

    dobby10 Senior Member
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    You shouldn't have any problem keeping your current number, unless the number is not one in NYC or North Jersey.
     
  7. GSMMan

    GSMMan New Member

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    The benefits of GSM far outweigh anything CDMA and TDMA could ever accomplish. I am currently in DC and using my unlocked T68i that I purchased in Hong Kong on ATT, Voicstream, and Cingular networks. As long as a phone is unlocked and runs on GSM1900 (800/1800 are usually in Asia/Europe) networks you can use it on on any of those 3 providers. No more being tied to a crappy plan just because you'd have to buy a new phone. Since the T68i is triband, an unlocked phone will work anywhere in the world as long as theres a GSM provider. Just buy a sim card and a plan and plug it in.

    Buying an unlocked T68i is the best thing I ever did. If I feel like switching plans or get poor service in an area, just switch sim cards and use a provider with a stronger signal. Also, GSM phones are far more advanced than the others. The versatility of GSM blows the rest out of the water. For instance, I use the HBH-30 bluetooth headset with my T68i. I can walk around wherever I want. No more wires. Bluetooth technology lets you connect PDAs, laptops, and headsets just by walking within the 10meter work area. GPRS lets you transfer files at faster speeds, etc. Not to mention the world runs on GSM.
     
  8. bobolito

    bobolito Diamond Senior Member
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    netwire88,
    I am a Cingular customer in North NJ so I am in the NYC market but I am using a TDMA phone. Therefore, you and I are in the same situation. If you are like most people, you are primarily concerned with using your phone to stay in touch with friends and relatives. Therefore, staying with your TDMA phone may be the best move. GSM coverage is definitely inferior to TDMA in NY and NJ. Although I wouldn't say GSM is terrible here, I have my reasons to stay with my TDMA phone at least another couple of years until GSM coverage becomes as reliable as TDMA in this area. TDMA will not be out of the picture anytime soon. You would be hard pressed to find a place where there's no TDMA coverage in NJ. However, I bet you can find dead GSM spots a lot easier. Of course, GSM has a lot more to offer in terms of features and convenience, but what good is all that if you can't get a signal? Just wait a little longer so you won't be dissapointed.
     
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  9. netwire88

    netwire88 New Member

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    Thanks everyone for the advice. I think I'll wait a bit for GSM. Coverage is more important for me. As far as the phone, I'm a big fan of Nokia, are they going to bring over some cool phones in the future for GSM?
     

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