Welcome to Our WirelessAdvisor Community!

You are viewing our forums as a GUEST. Please join us so you can post and view all the pictures.
Registration is easy, fast and FREE!

Apple ‘Error 53’ kills 3rd party repaired iPhone 6

Discussion in 'Wireless News' started by JFB, Feb 5, 2016.

  1. JFB

    JFB Gold Senior Member
    Administrator Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 1998
    Messages:
    5,015
    Cell Tower Picture Gallery:
    7
    Likes Received:
    794
    Location:
    New Jersey, USA
    My Phone:
    Essential PH-1
    Wireless Provider(s):
    Simple Mobile (T-Mobile MVNO)
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
    palandri likes this.
  2. palandri

    palandri Former Palm Guy
    Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2009
    Messages:
    1,169
    Likes Received:
    847
    Location:
    Chicago
    My Phone:
    Pixel 4
    Wireless Provider(s):
    Project Fi
    It can't possible be legal for Apple to punish people by bricking their phone.
     
  3. dmapr

    dmapr Silver Senior Member
    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2006
    Messages:
    4,436
    Likes Received:
    1,138
    Location:
    Bay Area, CA
    My Phone:
    Pixel XL
    Wireless Provider(s):
    Verizon Wireless; MTS
    They had some far-fetched explanation about how that may violate the security of the fingerprint reader. But yes, doesn't really sound all that legal to me.
     
    palandri likes this.
  4. KevinJames

    KevinJames WA's 1st retired mod
    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2001
    Messages:
    4,044
    Likes Received:
    739
    Location:
    Central Valley NorCA
    My Phone:
    Samsung S7-Edge
    Wireless Provider(s):
    AT&T & Verizon
    But isn't Apple the martin shkreli of the digital industry? They can do whatever they want with impunity.

    I'm JUST KIDDING!
     
    palandri likes this.
  5. palandri

    palandri Former Palm Guy
    Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2009
    Messages:
    1,169
    Likes Received:
    847
    Location:
    Chicago
    My Phone:
    Pixel 4
    Wireless Provider(s):
    Project Fi
    Something else mention in the article, "...Could Apple’s move, which appears to be designed to squeeze out independent repairers, contravene competition rules?...". This should be covered by antitrust laws in the states. Europe seems to strongly enforce anti-competition laws. I remember when Apple tried to tie the iPhone to one carrier in Europe and that was rejected in Europe as preventing competition and Apple wasn't allowed to do it in Europe.
     
  6. viewfly

    viewfly Mobile RF Advisor
    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2003
    Messages:
    5,999
    Likes Received:
    848
    My Phone:
    iPhone XS Space Grey
    Wireless Provider(s):
    AT&T; Tmobile SIM only
    Reading around the web, most users are thinking this is a good thing. Preventing a iphone with a replaced ( and possibly) hacked touch ID giving access to your secure data.

    It's seems the 3rd party repair shops are unaware or don't know how to reset the software security after the ID sensor has been replaced — OEM or otherwise. I'm guessing that Apple found a security issue with a replaced ID and addressed it in IOS 9. Having a stolen phone where access is allowed with a hacked sensor would be a big issue.

    Since replacing a battery, earphone jack, microphone can be done, it (Apple) is not disallowing all third party repairs. Just the security with the fingerprint sensor.

    Seems plausible. Although I don't know why the finger ID could be disabled and only the 6 digit password allowed.

    Appears that Apple is taking security seriously.

    My 2 cents.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  7. dmapr

    dmapr Silver Senior Member
    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2006
    Messages:
    4,436
    Likes Received:
    1,138
    Location:
    Bay Area, CA
    My Phone:
    Pixel XL
    Wireless Provider(s):
    Verizon Wireless; MTS
    Most users who don't have the Error 53, I bet :D

    Seriously, I don't think that Error 53 is the issue, the lack of communication/warning from Apple is. They could have issued a security bulletin advising people that a third-party repaired touch id sensors are subject to this prior to them updating. They could have made the check part of the upgrade procedure that would abort the update if the issue was detected. They could have disabled the sensor alone, not the whole phone. They did none of these things, and that is the issue IMHO.
     
  8. viewfly

    viewfly Mobile RF Advisor
    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2003
    Messages:
    5,999
    Likes Received:
    848
    My Phone:
    iPhone XS Space Grey
    Wireless Provider(s):
    AT&T; Tmobile SIM only
    Actually there was a warning. Admittedly, I never knew this, but the iMore article below from 2013, states that each specific A7 chip is paired with each sensor and cable. Replacing without pairing will cause a failure.

    From the news stories I read, not pairing properly is the problem. Or the non OEM hardware, or both.

    And Apple today stated clearly that authorized repair shops and Apple retail repair shops know this.

    So perhaps before iOS 9, unauthorized shops found a illegal workaround, that Apples closed up, for security. Or it was just done innocently, that the 3rd unauthorized shops didn't know, because the repair worked fine until the update.

    I have no problem with that. The few that are affected, benefits us from cutting down on stolen iPhones.

    I see it no differently than preventing unauthorized smart keys to your car or office entry. Apple giving away the security patch would only alert criminals not to update. An iOS may inform you of unauthorized parts or conflicts in software, but in the case of security, it's a different situation.

    I don't see this as a money grabbing monopoly. But a security issue. So now it is out there, unauthorized repair shoppers beware.

    PS: my touch sensor wasn't working last week. So I just use the passcode until I rebooted the phone. All is okay now. Unless the screen broke, I would do the same, until I can exchange the phone by nail or a authorized shop, store.

    From 2013

    http://9to5mac.com/2013/10/31/the-i...print-sensor-is-paired-to-a-specific-a7-chip/

    http://www.imore.com/apple-took-tou...er-secure-enclave-heres-how-and-what-it-means





    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
    #8 viewfly, Feb 8, 2016
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2016
  9. charlyee

    charlyee Ultimate Insanity
    Super Moderator Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2002
    Messages:
    9,895
    Cell Tower Picture Gallery:
    135
    Likes Received:
    1,566
    Location:
    SE Wisconsin
    My Phone:
    iPhone X
    Wireless Provider(s):
    at&t/Airtel/Turkcell
    Vf, the article doesn't mention it that will render the phone inoperable, which is what I understand what happens.

    These phones may not be stolen and the unauthorized repair shops are probably not crooks. In many countries, smaller towns/villages do not have Apple or authorized dealers and the corner shop can fix everything from eye glasses to cars to mobiles out of sheer necessity. They are typically honest garage shop operations and don't try to gouge people.

    I agree that it maybe a security issue but bricking the phone is a bit drastic.

    When I had Androids and rooted them, any official update would fail but my phone would keep working fine. I believe the same could have been done by Apple.
    Agreed!


    Sent from my iPad Air 2
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
    dmapr likes this.
  10. viewfly

    viewfly Mobile RF Advisor
    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2003
    Messages:
    5,999
    Likes Received:
    848
    My Phone:
    iPhone XS Space Grey
    Wireless Provider(s):
    AT&T; Tmobile SIM only
    Nope, I have to disagree with both of you. Clearly the repair shop doesn't know what it is doing. Something unauthorized has been done.

    Many highly secure keys operate the same way ( besides the tumbler, other electronic features are used). A count of key replacements and by who need to be recorded. Unauthorized ones don't work and your office ( or car perhaps ) is bricked.

    In the article, exchanging the ID sensor between two iPhones will cause both sensors to not function. So the shops had to do something to make them work, but not to some protocol acceptable to Apple security enclave.

    It seems Apple has clamped down on that, causing the phones to brick, to avoid a security possible breech. That is a good thing for the greater good of all of us. The iPhone doesn't brick cause the sensor broke. Only because it was repaired by an unauthorized shop.

    The iMore article seems to me indicate it is meant to prevent the man in the middle breech. Meaning if I can replace your ID sensor with another, there is a pathway to your secure phone.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
    #10 viewfly, Feb 8, 2016
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2016
  11. charlyee

    charlyee Ultimate Insanity
    Super Moderator Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2002
    Messages:
    9,895
    Cell Tower Picture Gallery:
    135
    Likes Received:
    1,566
    Location:
    SE Wisconsin
    My Phone:
    iPhone X
    Wireless Provider(s):
    at&t/Airtel/Turkcell
    I wonder if security was all that important to Apple why did it take until iOS 9 when fingerprint scanner started with iOS 7 I believe.

    Oh and btw, if one damages the home button where the fingerprint ID is non operational but the phone is fully functional otherwise and one chooses to keep using it until they are able to get it repaired - it will also brick the phone with Error 53. Provided of course it has iOS 9.

    So no one better drop their phone unless they can run to an authorized dealer right away :D

    http://www.theguardian.com/money/20...e-update-handset-worthless-third-party-repair




    Sent from my iPhone.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  12. viewfly

    viewfly Mobile RF Advisor
    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2003
    Messages:
    5,999
    Likes Received:
    848
    My Phone:
    iPhone XS Space Grey
    Wireless Provider(s):
    AT&T; Tmobile SIM only
    I don't know if any of the scenarios you give are true, CDG. If one never set up Touch ID , or even a password, why would a error 53 show up? There are lots of questions to ask, with no answers, to analyze the problem

    My point is that Apple has a very plausible explanation. And maybe they burped, went overboard, and it will be changed. I have no idea, nor anyone's post that I read, has any idea. But the security concern is very real and reasonable.

    The opinions that are circulating around that the web, that Apple is forcing out non Apple repair, or non OEM parts is not the only possible reason here. And not likely the reason. That's my point. From the iMore article Apple seems like they thought it through, so that just replacing the sensor is not a pathway into the system ( the chip ID is tagged to the sensor ID and personalized to your phone)

    WE should be concerned about security, as much as Apple. Some use Touch ID as a gimmick. Others use it to control access to bank accounts, credit cards, etc, so we are talking BIG concerns about letting small shops in Afghanistan getting a door inside Apple's system. Apple has to ensure a tight system for banks to sign on.

    Some set up their iPhone to erase all data if 10 failed passcode attempts are made. The phone is bricked then too. Apple can't help you there either, so have a cloud backup of your data. Something these guys in these stories should have too.

    We will see how this plays out. I'm not jumping on the hysteria bandwagon.




    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
  13. charlyee

    charlyee Ultimate Insanity
    Super Moderator Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2002
    Messages:
    9,895
    Cell Tower Picture Gallery:
    135
    Likes Received:
    1,566
    Location:
    SE Wisconsin
    My Phone:
    iPhone X
    Wireless Provider(s):
    at&t/Airtel/Turkcell
    Sorry vf, you lost me there. All I said is that even if you don't get it repaired by an unauthorized repair facility but just try using an iOS 9 device with a damaged finger print scanner, it will brick it.

    Yes the security concern is real and the intent may or may not be to edge out non authorized dealers, but irrevocably bricking the phone is certainly going overboard.

    Warning and/or temporarily disabling would have been enough.


    My 2 cents.

    PS: I had to get stitches accompanied by antibiotic shot from the camp vet, on my last wildlife trip. She is typically used to treating hyaenas, jackals and all the way up the food chain to an occasional tiger or two. I would think nothing of getting my phone repaired by the camp mechanic that maintains the rickety jeeps, changes light bulbs, keeps the generator running etc.

    Sent from my iPhone.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  14. viewfly

    viewfly Mobile RF Advisor
    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2003
    Messages:
    5,999
    Likes Received:
    848
    My Phone:
    iPhone XS Space Grey
    Wireless Provider(s):
    AT&T; Tmobile SIM only
    I'm just asking, why is that the case? If you are not using the Touch ID, why would it check it, and brick the phone? Any specific reference, that is solid? Touch ID's break all the time, without dropping . Never heard of them bricking a phone.
    Trusting one person is not the issue. Many more people, or strangers that stole your phone are not trustworthy.

    There is no hindered efforts for a shop to replace your battery, or microphone and bricking your phone. This is very security specific.

    And blood thirsty lawyers are already on it.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
  15. viewfly

    viewfly Mobile RF Advisor
    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2003
    Messages:
    5,999
    Likes Received:
    848
    My Phone:
    iPhone XS Space Grey
    Wireless Provider(s):
    AT&T; Tmobile SIM only
    So since I'm the resident Apple apologist. Here is my scenario.

    Back in 2013 it was known that even switching IDsensors between two iPhones would cause failure. Not bricking, but non ID operation. The ID sensor is tagged to each chip. An Apple tech had to re pair it properly.

    So maybe Apple became aware that shops found a way around this; a security breech.

    So in order round up malicious persons they bricked all unpaired ID, as a one time operation. Unfortunately,some honest persons were affected. But you can't warn criminals. Otherwise they would not update.

    And that is all it is.

    Back in the day, I wished that Apple would take the IMEI of my stolen phone and prevent anyone from registering with iTunes with it. But they didn't.

    So I'm with Apple on this one.
    So now that the cat is out if the bag,it's over.

    PS: I think you can only get a smart key replacement for you car at the dealer too.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  16. dmapr

    dmapr Silver Senior Member
    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2006
    Messages:
    4,436
    Likes Received:
    1,138
    Location:
    Bay Area, CA
    My Phone:
    Pixel XL
    Wireless Provider(s):
    Verizon Wireless; MTS
    Glad you are, cause they're un-bricking all bricked phones :D
    https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT205628

    Further, http://techcrunch.com/2016/02/18/ap...-ios-to-restore-iphones-disabled-by-error-53/ quotes Apple as follows:

    Note: this will not re-enable Touch ID, the security aspect remains unchanged (as it should), it's only the bricking of the device that was not an intended outcome.
     
    charlyee likes this.
  17. charlyee

    charlyee Ultimate Insanity
    Super Moderator Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2002
    Messages:
    9,895
    Cell Tower Picture Gallery:
    135
    Likes Received:
    1,566
    Location:
    SE Wisconsin
    My Phone:
    iPhone X
    Wireless Provider(s):
    at&t/Airtel/Turkcell
    I am glad Apple fesses up to the bricking being a mistake.

    That's what most of us has being saying all along. Over and being unethical in my opinion, it would have been a sure way for many to ditch iOS.
    Here is another source
    Apple rolls out 9.2.1 patch to fix iPhones bricked by 'Error 53'
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  18. dmapr

    dmapr Silver Senior Member
    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2006
    Messages:
    4,436
    Likes Received:
    1,138
    Location:
    Bay Area, CA
    My Phone:
    Pixel XL
    Wireless Provider(s):
    Verizon Wireless; MTS
    Another thing that was mentioned somewhere and should've been a dead giveaway of the error being unintentional is that apparently it only affected people who used iTunes to update, OTA updates did not exhibit the problem.
     
    charlyee likes this.
  19. charlyee

    charlyee Ultimate Insanity
    Super Moderator Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2002
    Messages:
    9,895
    Cell Tower Picture Gallery:
    135
    Likes Received:
    1,566
    Location:
    SE Wisconsin
    My Phone:
    iPhone X
    Wireless Provider(s):
    at&t/Airtel/Turkcell
    I totally missed that, thanks for bringing it up.

    I typically always update via iTunes for iOS X and sometimes for X.x but never have for X.X.x.


    Sent from my iPad Air 2
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  20. viewfly

    viewfly Mobile RF Advisor
    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2003
    Messages:
    5,999
    Likes Received:
    848
    My Phone:
    iPhone XS Space Grey
    Wireless Provider(s):
    AT&T; Tmobile SIM only
    @dmapr

    What can I say? Garbage data in and garbage analysis out.
    No one gave the full story here.

    If your unit had a damaged sensor or had the Touch ID replaced by a 3 rd party... And the you updated via the cloud OTA, you didn't get an error 53.

    Only those who updated via iTunes on a Mac or PC

    From the Apple Doc:

    "The update is not for users who update their iPhones over the air (OTA) via iCloud. If you update your phone that way, you should never have encountered Error 53 in the first place. "

    If the media ( and those dang lawyers) had mentioned that important detail, this would not have been an international story.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
    #20 viewfly, Feb 19, 2016
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2016
  21. dmapr

    dmapr Silver Senior Member
    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2006
    Messages:
    4,436
    Likes Received:
    1,138
    Location:
    Bay Area, CA
    My Phone:
    Pixel XL
    Wireless Provider(s):
    Verizon Wireless; MTS
    Well, if Apple hadn't tried to run with that "it's a security feature" angle, it wouldn't have been a story either. I understand they just goofed up, happens left and right and I'll never hold that against them. If they had said "we're investigating" I would've been happy too. It's that righteous attitude that made me cringe.
     
    #21 dmapr, Feb 19, 2016
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2016
    charlyee likes this.
  22. viewfly

    viewfly Mobile RF Advisor
    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2003
    Messages:
    5,999
    Likes Received:
    848
    My Phone:
    iPhone XS Space Grey
    Wireless Provider(s):
    AT&T; Tmobile SIM only
    So the affected users didn't understand the problem, and immediately claim that Apple is fleecing their customers, forcing us to use authorized shops...bad Apple.

    And Apple didn't understand the problem either, probably not knowing immediately the facts, from users, to track down the bug, giving misleading answers that people jump on.

    Both groups blundered, IMO. Given the ratios of OTA vs plug in updaters, this wasn't as big a deal as thought.

    It's a lesson not to trust at first blush users/ media stories without thinking it through, all asking all the questions, and keeping calm.

    From what I read, the stories would say 'some' users are affected. That should have been fleshed out.

    Most embarrassing to the legal suit against Apple.




    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
  23. dmapr

    dmapr Silver Senior Member
    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2006
    Messages:
    4,436
    Likes Received:
    1,138
    Location:
    Bay Area, CA
    My Phone:
    Pixel XL
    Wireless Provider(s):
    Verizon Wireless; MTS
    Wasn't the first Apple response to affected users "too bad, should've used an authorized repair service"? Users are not required to understand the problem, that's what the service is for -- to explain it. if your car stops starting you don't have to understand whether it's your accumulator that died, the spark plugs that gave out or something else -- that's what the mechanic is supposed to figure out. I don't think any dealer would flat out tell a customer to buy a new car if it's been serviced by unauthorized center. They'll charge you, but fix it.
     
  24. viewfly

    viewfly Mobile RF Advisor
    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2003
    Messages:
    5,999
    Likes Received:
    848
    My Phone:
    iPhone XS Space Grey
    Wireless Provider(s):
    AT&T; Tmobile SIM only
    Given there appears to have been no tech sheet on this undiscovered bug, and when presented with a bricked phone and a story about a repair shop in Timbuktu, it's not an unusual response, until the facts were fleshed out.

    I suspect the PR head in any firm would have given the same first response.

    What Apple officially said was that the error would occur with a malicious spec'd sensor. That still may be true.




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
    #24 viewfly, Feb 19, 2016
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2016
  25. charlyee

    charlyee Ultimate Insanity
    Super Moderator Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2002
    Messages:
    9,895
    Cell Tower Picture Gallery:
    135
    Likes Received:
    1,566
    Location:
    SE Wisconsin
    My Phone:
    iPhone X
    Wireless Provider(s):
    at&t/Airtel/Turkcell
    I plugged in my iDevices to iTunes for backup and for both devices it asked if I wanted to update to 9.2.1. I canceled out for both, my devices are on 9.2.1 and if I look for an OTA update from my devices, it says I am all up to date.

    So I am thinking there is a disconnect between the two methods of updating probably resulting from the extra update that was pushed out for error 53. Which was only for those who updated via iTunes.


    Sent from my iPad Air 2
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...

Share This Page

Copyright 1997-2020 Wireless Advisor™, LLC. All rights reserved. All registered and unregistered trademarks are the property of their respective holders.
WirelessAdvisor.com is not associated by ownership or membership with any cellular, PCS or wireless service provider companies and is not meant to be an endorsement of any company or service. Some links on these pages may be paid advertising or paid affiliate programs.

Positive SSL
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice