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800 Mhz VS 1900 Mhz

Discussion in 'GENERAL Wireless Discussion' started by ChaosThyre81, Apr 23, 2005.

  1. ChaosThyre81

    ChaosThyre81 Member
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    Different cellular providers use different frequencies. Now, what are the advantages of each? 800Mhz and 1900Mhz? Disadvantages? Also, would the higher frequency have faster data rates?

    M.
     
  2. larry

    larry Sprint loyalist and former mod
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    I'm going to move this to the general discussion forum where it should be.
     
  3. agentHibby

    agentHibby Iowa Cellular Guru
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    Ok 800 MHz is the Cellular Band it was created in 1981 and went nationwide in 1986. There are typically 2 Cellular providers in each market A and B each with 25 MHz each (due to the AT&T Cingular merger there are some markets where they have both A and B so they have the full 50 MHz in a few markets in Texas and Florida). Cellular is required to send out the analog (AMPS) signal digital is optional. On Feb 18th, 2008 analog is an optional so cellular provider can choose to shut down analog networks. Many Cellular providers network will cover the whole market. Here is a regional cellular map.

    1900 MHz is the PCS band (Personal Communications System). It was created in 1994 and went nationwide in 1996. PCS providers are required send out a digital signal and analog is optional (nobody has yet to do analog on PCS band). The idea originally was to have the bid companies get 30 MHz PCS A and B (large major trading markets) and mid size companies 30 MHz C block (with smaller basic trading markets, several basic trading make 1 major trading market). Small local providers get 30 MHz D block using basic trading market layout. In 1995 A and B PCS blocks were auctioned off and then the C block was auctioned off. After the C block was auctioned off the demand for PCS went threw the roof. So FCC decided that providers could hand part of the C block back making it two 15 MHz or three 10 MHz parts of the C block. D block was later auctioned off in three 10 MHz blocks D, E, F. The National providers now have most of the 120 MHz of PCS spectrum now and usually have a network on freeways and metros and some other rural areas. There are a few local providers that cover the whole market in rural areas. Nextel will be getting a nationwide 10 MHz PCS G Block license soon. FCC says they may auction off in the future 10 MHz H and J blocks (this is several years away if it does happen).

    Right now anything that can be done for high-speed data can be done on both Cellular and PCS. There will probably be a day when the data will get so fast that you can't do it on Cellular and only be PCS. I think it will be awhile for that right now.

    What is better PCS or Cellular?? This topic has allot augment so I will not go into which is better. You will need to search the forums, because there has been allot of discussion about that here in that past.
     
  4. Sprint PCS 411

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    Ok well here are some things....


    1900 has doesn't cover as much ground as 800/850 does. Also 1900 doesn't have as good as in building penetration as 800/850.
     
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  5. ChaosThyre81

    ChaosThyre81 Member
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    Frequency and Speed

    The higher the frequency, the faster data could be sent I'd think being the faster the frequency the more cycles per second?

    M.
     
  6. MeatChicken

    MeatChicken Senior Member
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    Re: Frequency and Speed

    Data is a function of spectrum bandwidth, all Radio frequencies travel at the same "speed of light". Cps/Mhz is not the "speed" of the radio wave (as it is in a pentium chip, where they are Not referring to radio waves).
    10Mhz of spectrum @ 800Mhz will give "Phone Company" the same data bandwidth as 10Mhz @ 1900Mhz.
    Since the "older" 800Mhz bands are being well-used (filled) for voice calls, you see many carriers deploying data on their newer, less used 1900Mhz spectrum, where they have the unused bandwidth.
    1900Mhz cell sites have to be spaced closer to each other, to give the same signal strength as 800Mhz, meaning more 1900's cells are needed in a given area.
    This is not always possible, especially in Rural/Suburban areas where all carriers are basically made to use that "same existing pole/tower" in the area, spacing of which may not even be great for 800, giving the 800Mhz carriers more range than the 1900's in many areas. In more urbanized areas where 1900 has the same "outdoor" signal strength as the 800's, they still have slightly less indoor coverage.
    A simple test will show how 1900Mhz signals are attenuated more indoors than 800Mhz:
    Stand outside the door of a building with your phone's -dB test screen. Make a note of the 800Mhz carriers signal strength at outside spot, then go to a spot deeper into the building & take a reading.
    Repeat the same process with a 1900Mhz signal, & you will find that the 1900 signal will always be about 8 to 18 dB more attenuated than the 800 signal, regardless of the start number.
    If they both happen to read "-70" at outside spot, the 800 carrier will be stronger in the inside spot.
    If the readings outside are different, the "difference" between the outside/inside spots will still always be that 8 to 18dB or so more than what the 800Mhz "difference" is - If , for example 800Mhz went down "10db" from inside/outside, the 1900 signal will have gone down about 22dB from inside/outside...
     
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  7. viewfly

    viewfly Mobile RF Advisor
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    To sum this up, all major carriers use both frequencies. They may use only one band in some markets however. Tmobile is the only exception in the USA; they use only 1900Mhz.

    At the best data speeds available today in cell service (average of 300Kbits/sec), the difference between these two frequencies is of little consequence. For example, to put in perpective, much higher bandwidth applications (like video broadcast TV, since the 1940's, channels 2-13) operate only between 54 to 200 Mhz.


    800 Mhz has better coverage indoors, but this is really more a function of the house construction (wood vs metal) and the cell tower coverage. I was in Paris, France a couple of weeks ago and the coverage on the higher frequency band was superb indoors.
     
  8. agentHibby

    agentHibby Iowa Cellular Guru
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    That is kind of ture Verizon and Cingular do both 800 and 1900. Sprint is also 1900 only and there are some local providers like Snake River PCS that is also 1900 only. So there are some 800 only many ma and pa's providers in Texas. Many 1900 only and many providers that use both 800 and 1900.
     
  9. viewfly

    viewfly Mobile RF Advisor
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    Oh yes, I forgot Sprint. Thanks for the correction. Otherwise, I carefully meant major providers, not all the local ma and pops's.

    Best,
     
  10. agentHibby

    agentHibby Iowa Cellular Guru
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    I am not clear either :banghead:
    I know you meant national providers. Just wanted to point out that some providers use 1 band or 2 bands. This is ture with nation providers all the way down to a local ma and pop's.
     
  11. MOTOhooligan

    MOTOhooligan Former Mobile Data Addict
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    SUNDAY! SUNDAY! SUNDAY! 800Mhz faces off against it's longtime rival, 1900Mhz. CDMA! TDMA! GSM! You'll pay for the whole seat but you'll only need... THE EDGE! Be there!
     
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  12. viewfly

    viewfly Mobile RF Advisor
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    LOL. MONDAY! MONDAY! MONDAY! it's Allover vs the IN network!
    :biggrin:
     

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