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Cell Phone Signal Booster

Discussion in 'GENERAL Wireless Discussion' started by der7495, Jan 16, 2011.

  1. der7495

    der7495 New Member

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    Location:
    Michigan
    Wireless Provider(s):
    Sprint
    I vacation in the eastern U.P. of Michigan (Lake Huron). My Sprint cell phone is undependable. I have tried AT&T and experienced the same type service. Straight Talk (which uses Verizon) is better. Recently, I read that Straight Talk will begin using both Verizon & AT&T towers.

    I would like to know if signal booster amplified antenna will work. I have been unable to use Verizon broadband usb for internet (although it works across the bay). I have lots of trees that I'm sure interfere with the signal. If I place an antenna at the water edge (where there are no trees), will that give me a strong enough signal for internet & cell phone usage?
     
  2. Maximum Signal

    Maximum Signal Senior Member Senior Member

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    Location:
    Buffalo
    My Phone:
    Samsung Galaxy S4
    Wireless Provider(s):
    Verizon , Sprint , Millenicom
    A good wireless amplifier system should do the trick for . You will need a dual band system as Sprint operates on 1900 mhz and Verizon operates on 800 mhz and 1900 mhz . Our new Maximum Signal by SCT wireless line work well . You can check them out at Maximum Signal - NOW, You can Hear Me! . There are lots of other good brands out there , just make sure you get a good dealer with a return policy whichever way you go in case the system does not fit your needs.

     
  3. tlagrone

    tlagrone New Member

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    Location:
    Anchorage, AK
    My Phone:
    Blackberry Bold 9000
    Wireless Provider(s):
    AT&T, MTA Wireless, T-Mobile
    I have been using a Wilson signal booster with low-loss cable and dual Yagi antennas (separate 850 and 1900 mHz antennas with combiner) to give my remote cabin in Alaska a decent signal. On half mile away, I can get a better signal without any amplification by shooting straight across a lake. The towers were 17 miles away.

    The 3G signal is undependable during the summer with leaves on the trees. Great 3G signal good for internet during the winter.

    You should be able to get up to 30 miles over the lake with a directional system.

    I have several cell phones and I noticed that T-Mobile specifically prohibits use of amplifiers. (They don't do business in Alaska)

    Check your contract restrictions.

    If you are interested, I have a complete system (12 volt) available now since a new cell tower was built 1 mile from my cabin and turned on this month. Send a personal message if interested.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2011
  4. Nextel32708

    Nextel32708 Junior Member Junior Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Florida
    My Phone:
    Nokia Lumia 710
    Wireless Provider(s):
    T-Mobile (Voice/SMS/Data)
    Really? (Asking in all sincerity).

    I actually have a Cel-Fi Signal Booster that is from T-Mobile (via a BETA pilot program I had been enrolled into). I have never seen this in my contract before, do you know what page/section/paragraph this clause is located within?

    I also find this strange as T-Mobile will begin to offer a 3G MicroCell soon, in addition to their UMA offerings they already have.

    Thank You,
    nextel32708
     
  5. tlagrone

    tlagrone New Member

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    Location:
    Anchorage, AK
    My Phone:
    Blackberry Bold 9000
    Wireless Provider(s):
    AT&T, MTA Wireless, T-Mobile
    Restriction on amplifiers.

    The restriction is buried in the Terms & Conditions:

    17. * Misuse of Service or Device. You agree not to misuse the Service or Device, including but not limited to: (a) reselling or rebilling our Service; (b) using the Service or Device to engage in unlawful activity, or in conduct that adversely affects our customers, employees, business, or any other person(s), or that interferes with our operations, network, reputation, or ability to provide quality service, including but not limited to the generation or dissemination of viruses, malware or “denial of service” attacks; (c) using the Service as a substitute or backup for private lines or dedicated data connections; (d) tampering with or modifying your T-Mobile Device; (e) "spamming" or engaging in other abusive or unsolicited communications, or any other mass, automated voice or data communication for commercial or marketing purposes; (f) reselling T-Mobile Devices for profit, or tampering with, reprogramming or altering T-Mobile Devices for the purpose of reselling the T-Mobile Device; (g) using the Service in connection with server devices or host computer applications, including continuous Web camera posts or broadcasts, automatic data feeds, automated machine-to-machine connections or peer-to-peer (P2P) file-sharing applications that are broadcast to multiple servers or recipients, “bots” or similar routines that could disrupt net user groups or email use by others or other applications that denigrate network capacity or functionality; (h) accessing, or attempting to access without authority, the information, accounts or devices of others, or to penetrate, or attempt to penetrate, T-Mobile’s or another entity’s network or systems; (i) running software or other devices that maintain continuously active Internet connections when a computer’s connection would otherwise be idle, or “keep alive” functions (e.g. using a Data Plan for Web broadcasting, operating servers, telemetry devices and/or supervisory control and data acquisition devices); or (j) assisting or facilitating anyone else in any of the above activities. Unless authorized by T-Mobile, you agree that you won't install, deploy, or use any regeneration equipment or similar mechanism (for example, a repeater) to originate, amplify, enhance, retransmit or regenerate a transmitted RF signal. You agree that a violation of this section harms T-Mobile, which cannot be fully redressed by money damages, and that T-Mobile shall be entitled to immediate injunctive relief in addition to all other remedies available.

    Any product T-Mobile offers would fall under the "Unless authorized ..." provision.
     
  6. mmillard

    mmillard Junior Member Junior Member

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    Location:
    Florida
    My Phone:
    LG Remarq
    Wireless Provider(s):
    Sprint
    Well, a microcell and a booster are two completely different amimals, considering the former does not actually broadcast an over-the-air signal back to the tower.

    As for T-Mobile's position on boosters, they do seem to have taken a low-key role in the FCC Docket that deals with the whole booster / jammer issue. However, you can probably glean out what they might be thinking by reviewing the CTIA filing of Nov 22.

    Link: Filing by CTIA- The Wireless Association in 10-4 on 2010-11-22 00:00:00.0

    Note importantly that all the major carriers are represented, none of whom, to my knowledge, allow boosters on their networks (with the exception of a relatively small handful of in-building repeaters which they install and control.).
     
  7. tlagrone

    tlagrone New Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Anchorage, AK
    My Phone:
    Blackberry Bold 9000
    Wireless Provider(s):
    AT&T, MTA Wireless, T-Mobile
    The docket is a very current topic. I will watch it for developments.

    Base link: Proceeding 10-4

    I did recheck my AT&T terms & conditions and could only find a reference to "...harmful to, interferes with, or ..." that would apply to a repeater causing problems. I am sure that AT&T and other carriers will try to eliminate anything that could increase their cost of doing business.

    In my particular location in Alaska, a 400 foot tall tower has been built by a local security company. They lease out the lower part of the tower to the cell phone companies (AT&T currently online). They will use the top part of the tower to provide communications and security monitoring to more distant customers that the cell phone companies have abandoned.

    In my personal case, the new tower eliminates any need for a booster.

    The local rural telephone company is in the final process of turning off the analog service to the remaining remote customers. They had a system referred to as "fixed cellular". The most distant customers will have to go to an alternate communications system (satellite or private terrestrial radio).
     
  8. Maximum Signal

    Maximum Signal Senior Member Senior Member

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    Location:
    Buffalo
    My Phone:
    Samsung Galaxy S4
    Wireless Provider(s):
    Verizon , Sprint , Millenicom
    The new Maximum Signal by SCT Wireless amplifiers pass new FCC standards being implemented and PTCRB . You can get info on them at www.maximumsignal.info

     

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